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Student Commencement Speaker Application and speech (500 words) due 4 pm, April 7th, 2017

Download the Flyer and Application Form

You are invited to be a Student Commencement Speaker for the College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics ceremony.

Must be in good academic standing and meet graduation requirements by end of Summer 2017.

For more information contact the commencement coordinator Yvonne Moar at: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or 657-278-3021.

 

Get access to Mathematica and Wolfram|Alpha Pro

Mathematica is currently installed in the following locations:

Computer labs

  • Many departmental labs.

Computer clusters

  • CSU Fullerton's Mathematica license can be used for grid computing. If you are interested in using Mathematica for parallel computing on a dedicated cluster, or in a distributed grid environment, please contact Paul Fish at Wolfram Research.

To request Mathematica and Wolfram|Alpha Pro, follow the directions below.

1. Faculty

  • Create an account (New users only):
    1. Go to user.wolfram.com and click "Create Account"
    2. Fill out form using a @fullerton.edu email, and click "Create Wolfram ID"
      (Note: A request with an email other than @fullerton.edu will not be approved)
    3. Check your email and click the link to validate your Wolfram ID
  • Request access to the product:
  • MathematicaWolfram|Alpha Pro
    For campus-owned machines:
    1. Fill out this form to request an Activation Key
    2. Click the "Product Summary page" link to access your license
    3. Click "Get Downloads" and select "Download" next to your platform
    4. Run the installer on your machine, and enter Activation Key at prompt
    For faculty on their personally owned machines:
    1. Fill out this form to request a home-use license from Wolfram.
    1. Fill out this form to request access
    2. Go to Wolfram|Alpha and click "Sign in" to access Wolfram|Alpha Pro

    2. Student

  • Create an account (New users only):
    1. Go to user.wolfram.com and click "Create Account"
    2. Fill out form using a @csu.fullerton.edu email, and click "Create Wolfram ID"
      (Note: A request with an email other than @csu.fullerton.edu will not be approved)
    3. Check your email and click the link to validate your Wolfram ID
  • Request access to the product:
  • MathematicaWolfram|Alpha Pro
    For a personally owned machine:
    1. Fill out this form to request an Activation Key and a home-use license
    2. Click the "Product Summary page" link to access your license
    3. Click "Get Downloads" and select "Download" next to your platform
    4. Run the installer on your machine, and enter Activation Key at prompt
    1. Fill out this form to request access
    2. Go to Wolfram|Alpha and click "Sign in" to access Wolfram|Alpha Pro

     

    Are you interested in putting Mathematica elsewhere? Please let IT or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. know.


    Mathematica Tutorials

    The first two tutorials are excellent for new users, and can be assigned to students as homework to learn Mathematica outside of class time.

      • Hands-on Start to Mathematica

        Follow along in Mathematica as you watch this multi-part screencast that teaches you the basics—how to create your first notebook, calculations, visualizations, interactive examples, and more.

      • What's New in Mathematica 10

        Provides examples to help you get started with new functionality in Mathematica 10, including the predictive interface.

      • How To Topics

        Access step-by-step instructions ranging from how to create animations to basic syntax information.

    • Learning Center

      Search Wolfram's large collection of materials for example calculations or tutorials in your field of interest.


    Teaching with Mathematica

    Mathematica offers an interactive classroom experience that helps students explore and grasp concepts, plus gives faculty the tools they need to easily create supporting course materials, assignments, and presentations.

    Resources for educators

      • Mathematica for Teaching and Education—Free video course

        Learn how to make your classroom dynamic with interactive models, explore computation and visualization capabilities in Mathematica that make it useful for teaching practically any subject at any level, and get best-practice suggestions for course integration.

      • How To Create a Lecture Slideshow—Video tutorial

        Learn how to create a slideshow for class that shows a mixture of graphics, calculations, and nicely formatted text, with live calculations or animations.

      • Wolfram Demonstrations Project

        Download pre-built, open-code examples from a daily-growing collection of interactive visualizations, spanning a remarkable range of topics.


    Research with Mathematica

    Rather than requiring different toolkits for different jobs, Mathematica integrates the world's largest collection of algorithms, high-performance computing capabilities, and a powerful visualization engine in one coherent system, making it ideal for academic research in just about any discipline.

    Resources for researchers

      • Mathematica for University Research—Free video course

        Explore Mathematica's high-level and multi-paradigm programming language, support for parallel computing and GPU architectures, built-in functionality for specialized application areas, and multiple publishing and deployment options for sharing your work.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Fall Calendar 2016    CLICK HERE for the Calendar.

    Research Opportunities at Cal State Fullerton

    The opportunity to engage in undergraduate research is a hallmark of the NSM student experience; all of the major departments in the college offer students the opportunity to engage in faculty-mentored research. Several departments also offer specific programs to support and mentor students in the research experience. The list below includes many of the research programs available to undergraduates, however countless other opportunities are available within the college.  If you do not see a program below that matches your interests, you can reach out to any faculty member for advice and opportunities.

    Graduate Readiness and Access in Mathematics (GRAM)
    The Graduate Readiness and Access in Mathematics (GRAM) Program is sponsored by a grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF). The program provides comprehensive preparation for underrepresented mathematics majors aspiring to graduate study in the mathematical sciences (mathematics, mathematics education, and statistics). The GRAM Scholars will benefit from many components of GRAM: rigorous content preparation, GRE preparation, training and development of problem-solving skills, undergraduate research, participation in professional conferences, cultural and family involvement, financial support for the GRAM Scholars, and many other forms of professional development designed to prepare the participants for success in graduate school.
    Contacts: Dr. Scott Annin, 657.278.7678, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. ; Dr. Anael Verdugo, 657.278.3670, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

    Bridges to Stem Cell Research (BSCR)
    The Bridges to Stem Cell Research is a one-year program that provides students with research experience in Molecular and Cell Biology in the areas of stem cell and regenerative medicine. Students are immersed in various cell biology techniques while at CSUF, and then the following year, they will undertake an internship in one of four participating research institutions (USC, UCI, CHOC, UCR).
    Contact: Dr. Nilay Patel, 657.278.2483, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

    California Pre-doctoral Program
    The California Pre-Doctoral Program is designed to increase the pool of potential faculty by supporting the doctoral aspirations of CSU students who have experienced economic and educational disadvantages. Winners will be designated as Sally Casanova Scholars, as a tribute to Dr. Sally Casanova, for whom the award is named. With the aid of a faculty sponsor, these scholars are exposed to unique opportunities to explore and help prepare them to succeed in doctoral programs. The program provides travel funds to visit doctorate-granting institutions, options for summer research internships, and funds for other related activities.
    Contact: Dr. Katherine Powers, 657.278.2618, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

    Howard Hughes Medical Institute Research Scholars Program (HHMI)
    The Howard Hughes Medical Institute Undergraduate Research Program is a variety of research, supportive studies, and workshops for students who have exceptional potential for, and a serious commitment to pursue biomedical research as a scientist (PhD) or physician-scientist (MD-PhD).
    Contact: Dr. Maria Linder, 657.278.3621, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

    Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation (LSAMP)
    The LSAMP program encourages and prepares college students from STEM disciplines for graduate programs. LSAMP has three tiers of students: research, community college transfer students, and participants. LSAMP serves 30-40 students per year bridging the gap between research faculty and students. Summer and academic year workshops, academic year conferences, research and summer research prepares students for post baccalaureate work.
    Contact: Leslie Montoya, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

    McNair Scholars Program
    The Ronald E. McNair Post-Baccalaureate Achievement Program was established by the U.S. Department of Education in 1986. The Program, named for astronaut and Challenger space shuttle crew member, Dr. Ronald E. McNair, encourages students to pursue graduate studies. The program provides opportunities to define goals, engage in research, and develop the skills and student/faculty mentor relationships critical to success at the doctoral level.
    Contact: Dr. Patricia E. Literte, 657.278.7367, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

    Minority Access to Research Careers (MARC)
    The Minority Access to Research Careers (MARC) Program is sponsored by a grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Its goal is to prepare students underrepresented in the biomedical sciences for success in a PhD program and research career.
    Contact: Dr. Amybeth Cohen, 657.278.2178, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

    Minority Health and Health Disparities International Research Training Program (MHIRT)
    The Minority Health and Health Disparities International Research Training (MHIRT) Program is an NIH-sponsored program that provides minority students with the opportunity to carry out research during the summer under the direction of world-renowned biochemists and molecular biologists at the Universities of Cambridge, Oxford, York, and London in Great Britain, the Chiang Mai University in Thailand, and Institutes of Basic and Clinical Research in Argentina.
    Contact: Dr. Marcelo Tolmasky, 657.278.2472, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

    Research Career Preparatory Program (RCP)
    The RCP program is for lower-division undergraduate students potentially interested in entering a research career. Its mission is to expose students at the beginning of their university career to the world of research and its potential benefits.
    Contact: Dr. Laura Arce, 657.278.7761, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

    Southern California Ecosystem Research Program (SCERP)
    The Southern California Ecosystems Research Program (SCERP) is an NSF-funded program that prepares students for careers in environmental industry, government agencies, and graduate programs in Biology or Environmental Science.
    Contact: Dr. Bill Hoese, 657.278.2476, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

    Urban Agriculture Community-based Research Experience (U-ACRE)
    The U-ACRE program focuses on the development of a research experience for undergraduates in agricultural ecosystems and biodiversity; social, cultural, and biological influences on behavior in terms of food choices; the holistic study of child growth and development across food environments; and economic and financial aspects of addressing food security through urban agriculture and good webs.
    Contact: Dr. Joel Abraham, 657.278.3138, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

    If you need assistance with creating your resume/CV and statement of purpose for a research opportunity make an appointment at the Career Center by calling 657.278.3121. Or check out the Career Center’s online resources at www.fullerton.edu/career.

    For more Cal State Fullerton Student Research Resources click here: http://www.fullerton.edu/research/student_resources/

    A. How Much Should You Study?

    This is really important! Study habits determine your success in college, so your success begins with you. One of the greatest challenges of a student entering college for the first time is realizing how much study time is needed to achieve their academic goals.

    If you are a first-time freshman, wouldn't you agree that college will be more challenging than high school and require a greater personal commitment? The total commitment for in-class instruction and homework in high school is about 35 hours per week. In college you will be in class approximately 15 hours a week. Successful NSM students study at least two hours per unit per week, or 25-35 hours per week for a student taking 12-17 units. Your total time commitment for school would be 40-50 hours per week, very similar to the time required for a full-time job.

    If you are a first-year transfer student you might already be aware of the academic challenges set forth by the college environment, nevertheless we encourage you to refine your academic success plan to meet the academic expectations of upper-division courses at CSUF.

    Sometimes taking the first step towards formulating an academic success plan can be difficult. Learn how to develop a plan and study 25-35 hours per week with the Empowerment Immersion Training. This training calls for filling out the Academic Tracking sheet and the Time Dominance Sheet.

    B. The Study 25-35 Empowerment Campaign-Themes

    Taking the first step towards creating and/or refining an academic success plan is half of the battle. You must then incorporate strategies and set forth a tactical plan for academic success in order to efficiently incorporate 25-35 hours of studying/homework at week.

    Follow the study 25-35 Sping 2014 phase dates and slogans and look for on line empowerment exercises as the semester progress to enhance and maintain your plan for academic success.

    Be patient. Focus. Believe in yourself. You are the most important factor in your academic success. We believe you can do it!

     

    There are opportunities for students to engage in research outside of Cal State Fullerton. The below websites are a sample of resources to search and locate research experiences throughout the country.

    Faculty in you major can also provide advice about more focused opportunities in your discipline.

    If you need assistance with creating your resume/CV and statement of purpose for a research opportunity make an appointment at the Career Center by calling 657.278.3121. Or check out the Career Center’s online resources at www.fullerton.edu/career.

    For more Cal State Fullerton Student Research Resources click here: http://www.fullerton.edu/research/student_resources/

     

    The end of the semester is approaching! Are you ready for finals?

    PHASE IV: Reinforce and Finish Strong

    During the months of April and May, it's time to recharge and give it all you got. Refer to the Empowerment Exercises below for tips on how you can achieve success in the last weeks of the semester.

    Empowerment Exercises:

    1. Calculate your current semester GPA before going into finals week. Click on the following link to access the Academic Advisement Center's GPA Calculator: http://www.fullerton.edu/aac/resources/gpa_calculator.php.

      The GPA calculator is easy to use and will show you where you stand before going into finals. Simply add up the points you have earned so far for each class and divide them by the points you could have earned at this time in the semester. Once you have calculated what grade you have so far in each class, input these grades into the GPA calculator and it will calculate what your GPA would be if the semester were over today. Many students are surprised by what they see!

    2. Set up a finals study schedule that works for you. Plan what you have to do and designate an appropriate amount of time to study for each final exam. Print and fill out the Time Dominance Tracker for assistance!

    3. Think about what conditions allow you to study best. Do you work better in the morning? Does working with others help you learn the material better? Do you study more effectively if you switch up your surroundings? Remember that different methods work better for different students. It's important to find the approach that works best for you.

    Here are some useful study techniques:

    1. Review the book.
    2. Review your notes and handouts.
    3. Compare your notes with classmates to see if you missed anything.
    4. If you skipped a class, ask a classmate, T.A., or professor what you missed.
    5. Review homework, quizzes, and tests. If you can't figure out why you got something wrong, go to your professor's office hours and ask.
    6. Go to final exam review sessions.
    7. Visit tutors one last time. Tutors at the Math Tutoring Center (MH-553) and those at the Opportunity Center (MH-488) will continue their free tutoring services until finals week. TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THIS!
    8. Make flashcards.
    9. PAY CLOSE ATTENTION to what the professor says will be on the test... they are the only ones that know.
    10. It's very important to keep your health in check. Take time away from studying to move around. Make sure you bring healthy snacks to study sessions to keep your brain energized. Get an appropriate amount of sleep. It doesn't matter how much you study, if you ignore your body's health you won't perform your best come finals day.

    The Study 25-35 Empowerment Campaign is aimed at helping first time freshmen and first-year transfer students succeed in their CSUF courses. Entering a four-year university for the first time is a big change from what you might be used to. It is important that you develop an understanding of the academic expectations of your professors as well as your responsibilities in the learning process. Remember, you earned your acceptance to CSUF, but with great power comes great responsibility. You must make sure to put some muscle to your academic plan for success. A perfect way to do this is by incorporating 25-35 hours of studying/homework time per week.

    This site is here to provide you with tips on HOW to create and/or enhance your 2012-2013 academic success plan so you can efficiently study 25-35 hrs per week. Follow the academic success phases of the Study 25-35 Empowerment Campaign, prime your academic success plan with the 25-35 Empowerment Immersion Training, and watch out for Empowerment Success Exercises throughout the academic year.

    We believe in you! Seize academic success!

    Empowerment Campaign Logo