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Desert Studies

Public Courses at the DSC

The Desert Studies Center hosts several weekend-long in-residence courses on various topics related to the Mojave Desert. Registration for these courses is through the University of California, Riverside Extension, and are available for credit. Registration may be done on line on line, or by calling 951-827-4105. Course fees include two nights’ lodging at the Center, a snack Friday evening, and five meals beginning with breakfast Saturday. Take a look at recent and upcoming courses in this series:

Annual Desert Symposium

In April each year, the California Desert Studies Consortium hosts an Annual Desert Symposium at the Desert Studies Center. The symposium organizers solicit presentations on current research in archaeology, history, paleontology, geology/geomorphology, biological sciences, multidisciplinary studies and environmental issues related to the California deserts and surrounding provinces. Presentations are given Friday and Saturday, with a concurrent poster session. Meals and lodging is provided at the Center for attendees. Student presentations or posters are eligible for the Bob and Bobbe Adams Best Student Paper Award.

The 2015 Annual Desert Symposium will be held April 17 & 18, 2015, with a field trip following on the 19th/20th. Details will be posted here as plans develop. For more information, contact the symposium organizers: Dr. William Presch (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. ) or Robert E. Reynolds (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. ).

A volume with symposium abstracts and a field trip guide is produced each year, and available at the symposium. Past symposium volumes are available as PDF downloads. Click on any volume(s) of interest below.

2001 Changing Face
2002 Between the Basins
2003 Lost Lakes
2004 Breaking Up
2005 Old Ores
2006 Making Tracks
2007 Wild, Scenic and Rapid
2008 Trough to Trough
2009 Landscape Evolution At An Active Plate Margin
2010 Overboard in the Mojave: 20 Million Years of Lakes and Wetlands
2011 The Incredible Shrinking Pliocene
2012 Search for the Pliocene: the southern exposures
2013 Raising Questions in the central Mojave Desert

Judith Presch Scholarship

The scholarship is open to undergraduate and graduate students pursuing research in the Mojave Desert. The scholarship is named in memory of Judith A. Presch, Human Resource Specialist, California State University, Fullerton and Desert Studies Center Supporter. Awarded annually to one undergraduate and one graduate student working through the Desert Studies Center, the successful applicants may also have all fees waived for use of the Desert Studies Center facilities for one year. Applications will be reviewed and evaluated by the Research Award Committee of the California Desert Studies Consortium. Awards will be announced in November. For additional information and application contact the Desert Studies Office at Department of Biological Science, California State University, Fullerton.

Volunteering

The California Desert Studies Consortium welcomes your interest in the volunteer program at the Desert Studies Center. Volunteers are an important part of the activities and programs at the Center. Sharing time, abilities, knowledge, and enthusiasm by working with the staff of the Center ensures a continuing high quality experience for you and our users. Serving as a volunteer is your way of saying thanks and involving your time in an institution whose goals you support.

The work is greatly appreciated by the Center and is both rewarding and fulfilling to the volunteer. Some of the tasks performed by volunteers include long-term data collection on bird species found on the Center’s grounds, working with computer/library cataloging, assisting with maintenance of the facilities’ infrastructure and utilizing personal skills and experience to enhance the user’s experience. Our volunteers form a diverse group of individuals with varying backgrounds. The minimum age is 21; there is no upper limit.

As a Center volunteer, you will be subject to California State University regulations. A volunteer is a person who contributes services for which there is no financial compensation. The services are given on a scheduled basis for assigned projects under the supervision of the Center’s Manager. No evaluation or recommendation, verbal or written, will be provided by the Center.

After completing an application form, a volunteer candidate may be asked to come to the Center for a preliminary interview. Volunteers will furnish references upon request. Volunteers are assigned tasks according to their skills and interests. All tasks are at the direction of the Manager.

All volunteers must submit an application form and sign a CSU Volunteer Identification Form. If you have a résumé available, please attach it to the email that will appear after you click "submit."

Volunteer

Volunteering at the Desert Studies Center The California Desert Studies Consortium welcomes your interest in the volunteer program at the Desert Studies Center. Volunteers are an important part of the activities and programs at the Center. Sharing time, abilities, knowledge, and enthusiasm by working with the staff of the Center ensures a continuing high quality experience for you and our users. Serving as a volunteer is your way of saying thanks and involving your time in an institution whose goals you support.

The work is greatly appreciated by the Center and is both rewarding and fulfilling to the volunteer. Some of the tasks performed by volunteers include long-term data collection on bird species found on the Center’s grounds, working with computer/library cataloging, assisting with maintenance of the facilities’ infrastructure and utilizing personal skills and experience to enhance the user’s experience. Our volunteers form a diverse group of individuals with varying backgrounds. The minimum age is 21; there is no upper limit.

As a Center volunteer, you will be subject to California State University regulations. A volunteer is a person who contributes services for which there is no financial compensation. The services are given on a scheduled basis for assigned projects under the supervision of the Center’s Site Manager. No evaluation or recommendation, verbal or written, will be provided by the Center.

Interviews

After completing an application form, a volunteer candidate may be asked to come to the Center for a preliminary interview. Volunteers will furnish references upon request. Volunteers are assigned tasks according to their skills and interests. All tasks are at the direction of the Site Manager.

Volunteers may be terminated if it is found that there is no longer a need for their services, or if their performance does not meet the requirements of the Site Manager.

Responsibilities

Volunteers are expected to arrive at the agreed upon time. Incoming and outgoing personal telephone calls on the Center’s line must be restricted to emergencies. No property from the Center, including books, shall be removed from the Center.

All volunteers must submit an application form and sign a CSU Volunteer Identification Form. Please click here to fill out an application form.

 

Soda Springs History

The DSC is situated at Soda Springs, a collection of groundwater seeps and springs along the western shore of Soda Dry Lake. In 1776, Spanish missionary Francisco Garces and a small band of soldiers became the first known Europeans to cross the Mojave Desert, being guided by Mojave Indians on a trade mission from their villages on the Colorado River, to Native American tribes on the coast of California. That trade route went from water source to water source across the desert, and Soda Springs was one of those, as well as being the gateway to the Mojave River, the main path to the Transverse Ranges and the coastal plains. Besides the transient Mojave Indians, the area was also inhabited by nomadic bands of Southern Piute, the Chemehuevi, who used Soda Springs seasonally for hunting, and gathering plant materials for food and fiber.

In 1826, trapper/explorer Jedediah Strong Smith and his party became the first American citizens to cross the Mojave, again being lead by Mojave traders, and their route likely took them to, or very near, Soda Springs. In 1853 and 1854, U.S. Army survey expeditions stayed at Soda Springs, looking for a railroad route along the 35th parallel. From 1857-60, a wagon road was established from Santa Fe, New Mexico, to Los Angeles, and the Mojave section largely followed the Native American trade route, and would become known as the Mojave Road. Soda Springs was an important layover camp, and in 1860, the Army constructed a simple defensible adobe structure, known as "Hancock's Redoubt", the first building at the oasis. The Army replaced it with a stone building in 1867, which was used as a commercial wagon stop (Soda Station) after the Army abandoned it a few years later. Remnants of that building appear to be incorporated into one of the buildings we use today.

Travel along the Mojave Road diminished after the 1880's, with completion of the Santa Fe Railroad to the south. In 1905, Frances Marion "Borax" Smith, the self proclaimed "Borax King", began construction of the Tonopah and Tidewater Railroad, from the Santa Fe Railroad, 37 miles to the south, through Soda Springs, and hence to his borate claims in Death Valley, a hundred miles to the north, ultimately pushing as far as Goldfield, Nevada. With arrival of the railroad to Soda Springs, the rich salt deposits of Soda Dry Lake were now commercially exploitable, and two salt recovery operations were established at Soda Springs, operating between 1907-1912. Remnants of the railroad and salt works are readily visible today at Soda Springs. The Tonopah and Tidewater Railroad was decommissioned in 1939, and Soda Springs once again became a quiet oasis at the end of the Mojave River.

The Zzyzx Era

In 1944, Curtis Howe Springer, a colorful religious broadcaster, lecturer, and health food entrepreneur, filed mining claims on 12,800 acres of federal land, which included the oases of Soda Springs. There he built a rustic health spa/resort, Zzyzx Mineral Springs, where his guests could soak in the mineralized water in a cross-shaped pool or heated mineral baths, partake in specialized dietary meals, attend lectures and religious services, and enjoy the clean air and sunshine of the Mojave Desert.

So why the name “Zzyzx”? Some say it was because Springer always insisted on “having the last word” in discussions on matters of health, religion, and politics, and he thought it clever to invent “the last word” alphabetically, and use it for the resort. Others say he wanted a name sounding like restful sleep. In either case, the name Zzyzx (rhymes with “rye-six”) certainly caught attention on road signs, literature and radio spots, inviting all to “come and rest at Zzyzx Mineral Springs – the last word in health”. You can hear a brief radio spot by Springer here.

The problem was, his mining claims on federal land did not permit him to develop such an operation, and in the 1960’s, the Bureau Land Management (BLM) began legal proceedings to have Zzyzx shut down and Springer removed from the property in violation of existing mining laws. After various negotiations, attempts to get Congressional intervention, and exhausting all appeals in federal court, Springer was removed (with a court order to never return to the site), and the facility shut down and locked up in 1974.

After considering several options for Zzyzx, the BLM finally decided in 1976 to sign a cooperative agreement with the California State University to occupy, renovate, and operate the site as a field station in support of educational and research activities in the region, and the Desert Studies Center was born. To view a TV News story on the event (and watch Springer roll into the scene – against court order - and draw away all the attention of the press, who were there to cover the story of the agreement), click here.

Soda Springs Habitats

The Desert Studies Center sits at the abrupt transition between the salt flats of Soda Dry Lake, at 930' above sea level, and the crest of southern Soda Mountains, at 2,180'. The ground water seeps along this portion of the western shoreline produce islands of salt marsh vegetation. In some of these marsh areas, shallow depressions form vernal pools from November – May, when the seepage rate to the surface exceeds the evaporation rate. This provides watering sites for some local wildlife, as well as habitat for migratory waterfowl, and the Pacific Tree Frog, Hyla regilla. The shoreline abruptly transitions to the alluvial slopes and wave-cut features of the Soda Mountains. Vegetation on the slopes begins with a relatively narrow zone of salt bushes (Atriplex spp.), and other evergreen shrubs tolerant of poorly drained alkaline/saline soils (Alkaline Scrub community). This zone rapidly gives way to a Creosote Bush Scrub community, dominated by Creosote Bush (Larrea tridentata) and white Bursage (Ambrosia dumosa). This plant community dominates the alluvial fans and bajada slopes, as well as the rocky slopes above. The alluvial fans are well developed and complex, with inter-braided and incised drainages, and more stable surfaces between the drainages, some developing distinctive aeolian silt soil horizons, resulting in patches of relatively barren "desert pavement" surfaces. The alluvial fans of the Soda Mountains have been intensively studied in terms of their geomorphic evolution, and their response to paleo-climatic change.

The Soda Mountains are a mixture of Triassic metavolcanic rocks, Cretaceous granites, and Permian limestone, uplifted during crustal extension (stretching) typical of much of the Basin and Range Geophysical Province, and resulting in the Soda Lake Basin.

At the DSC compound, there are aquatic habitats in the form of two man-made ponds, the larger of which, Lake Tuendae, harbors the endangered Mojave Tui Chub (Siphatales bicolor mohavensis), a minnow native to the Mojave River drainage, as well as the Saratoga Springs pupfish (Cyprinodon nevadensis nevadensis) native to Death Valley to the north. The Mojave Tui Chub, once thought to be extinct through hybridization with introduced coastal chubs in the Mojave River, were "rediscovered" in a small spring pool, now called Mojave Chub Spring, a short walk from the DSC buildings, and was the seed population from which other refugia in the Mojave have been stocked, in an effort to conserve this rare fish. These aquatic habitats attract seasonally migrant waterfowl, as well as resident American Coots, and Pie-billed Grebes.

Excellent bird habitat is found amongst the native mesquite trees (Prosopis spp) dotting the area, as well landscape Tamarisk trees, fan and date palms in and around the facilities. A short distance to the south, are aeolian sand deposits on alluvial fans, where sand-adapted plants (psammophytic) and animals can be studied and observed.

The communities and habitats immediately surrounding the DSC contain 176 plant species, 29 species of reptile/amphibian, 39 species of mammal (including 10 migratory bat species), over 250 species of birds, and many hundreds of invertebrates. Take a look at our species lists here.

Climate

Regional

The eastern Mojave Desert is characterized by wide day-night temperature fluctuations, seasonally strong winds, bi-modal rainy seasons (winter/spring storms and summer monsoons), and generally clear skies (usually great for astronomical observations). Conditions on any day can vary widely, depending on elevation and local topography. For current weather conditions and forecasts in the region from the National Weather Service, click here, and you can use the interactive map to click on a point forecast for any location on the map (click just below Baker for the Soda Lake Basin and Soda Springs area).

Soda Springs

At the DSC, climatic conditions are influenced by its low elevation of 940'(287m), and the topography surrounding the Soda Lake Basin. This location exposes the DSC to conditions of temperature and wind that can be more extreme than surrounding areas. Temperatures of over 100°F (38°C) are common from mid-May through September, with a maximum record of 125°F (51.6°C). On winter nights, temperatures can be significantly lower than surrounding areas, with the basin acting as a cold air "sink", trapping cold dense air descending from surrounding higher elevations. Nights below 32°F (0°C) can begin in November, and extend into February. The minimum temperature record is 8°F (-13.3°C). Monthly mean temperatures over a four-year study were:

Mean Temperatures Chart - About 

Relative Humidity is generally low, below 40% most of the year, and above 50% on most winter nights, and during and after precipitation events.  Summer afternoons often have humidity levels around 10% or lower; typical winter afternoons approximately 30%.  During and after summer storms, humidity near 100% can occur, with very warm temperatures.

Precipitation patterns are seasonal, with most rain coming the during the winter/spring season, when powerful storms come off the Pacific Ocean and enter Southern California (November- early April).  Only storms with enough energy and moisture left after passing over the coastal plain and mountain ranges produce significant rainfall in the desert interior.  There is a second rainy season – the summer monsoons (July-September), when tropical moisture can be drawn into the area from the south and east, creating conditions for localized heavy and violent thunderstorms.  During such events, an area can receive up to 2” of precipitation in just a few hours.  At the DSC, mean annual precipitation since 1980 is about 3.5”, but year to year variability is high (annual precipitation has ranged from 0.8” to 6.5” since 1980).  The driest months are May and June.

Wind at the DSC also varies seasonally, as low pressure systems move into and across the region. Periods with winds 25mph and higher are common features during the autumn and fall (generally west to southwesterly), and late winter/early spring (generally northeasterly).  Gusts over 60mph have been recorded.  While wind can be expected in all months, November, December and January are generally the calmest months, while March is usually the windiest.

Soda Lake - About

 

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Reservations and Guest Information

Reservation Procedure

Most of those who make use of the Center are either enrolled in college or university courses involved in some aspect of desert education such as archaeology, biology, geography, geology and history, or are engaged in research related to the desert. However, school groups and organized community groups whose activities are desert-oriented can also be accommodated and are welcomed. Advance reservations are necessary, both for those planning to stay overnight and for day-only use. To begin the process:



1. Contact our Administrative Coordinator, Norma Charest, at (657) 278-2428 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. to determine space availability. She will need the proposed dates of your visit, the number in the group, purpose for your visit, institution or group name, food plans (see 3 below), and the main contact person’s information. You will then be sent a reservation packet.

2. Payment of use fees (including catering fees) should be submitted to our campus office at least 30 days in advance of your arrival date.

3. Those opting for catered food service at the Center (preferred) must provide a list of which meals will be needed each day, including lunches to go into the field. It is important to poll the members of your group about any dietary restrictions, food allergies, etc., and let us know ASAP. If your group prefers to prepare their own meals (limited space available), you will need to obtain a special use kitchen permit from the San Bernardino County Public Health Department to use our facilities. Our office can provide the permit application form but this should be done well in advance.

Fees

A use fee is charged to defray the cost of maintenance, upkeep and repair (MUR fee) and is required of each individual or group before reservations can be confirmed. The MUR fee, which is subject to change without notice, is currently:

  • CSU and National Park Service affiliated use = $9/person/night
  • Non-CSU use = $18/person/night
  • Facility day-use only fee = $5/person/day
  • National Park Service approved commercial use (e.g., film production, etc.) = $35/person/night

For use of the Researcher Residences, the rate structure is:

  • CSU and National Park Service affiliated use = $20/night for the first individual and $9/night for each additional occupant
  • Non-CSU = $30/night for the first individual and $18/night for each additional occupant


Please note that the fee is set according to the number of spaces originally reserved; refunds for reductions of group size or cancellation are available up to 14 days prior to arrival.

Research Permits

If you or group members will be conducting research, you are required to fill out a DSC research permit application. The Center Managers can assist you with how to obtain government permits required by the National Park Service for the Mojave National Preserve and Death Valley National Park, or as required by the California Dept. of Fish and Wildlife, or the US Fish and Wildlife Service. These permits can have a long-lead time so you should start the process as early as possible.

After Confirmation

At least 10 days before your arrival, you must send the provided roster sheet showing ALL who will be in attendance (including gender), any special requests for couples, family or single occupancy rooms (these can sometimes be accommodated but cannot be guaranteed), and a daily itinerary. If group members will be arriving or departing on alternative dates during your stay, indicate those on the roster or itinerary. Email the roster, itinerary and any special requests to both the Manager and Site Steward at the Center.

If you will require any special room setups, AV equipment, lab equipment, or other items, please contact the DSC Managers in advance. They can also provide information on the greater region and its resources in advance of, or during your stay.

If the numbers in your group decrease from those originally proposed, you must notify our office within 14 days of arrival. Reduction or refund of fees due to reduced numbers in the group will not be issued within 10 days without the consent of the Director.

Finally, please be sure to copy and disseminate the list of items to bring to the Center to all participants. Please make sure every member of your group is well informed and prepared.

Arriving at the DSC

Groups are strongly encouraged to arrive as a group, with their group leader(s), and by 5 PM. Arrivals over various times on the arrival date are acceptable, but the mandatory orientation and room assignments will not take place until the entire group is on site. Agreeing to a target rendezvous time for the group works best, particularly if coming from different places/distances. Arrivals after 10 PM will be by prior arrangement with the Managers ONLY.

Conduct and Obligations of Guests

Typically, guests from several groups share the DSC at one time, operating on different schedules and with differing interests. While this can make your visit more interesting, it also makes certain codes of conduct and obligations necessary. Generally, conduct suitable to a school campus is expected. There is a strict quiet policy in and around dormitories after 10PM. Group leaders are required to arrive with or in advance of their group, check in with the DSC Manager, and arrange for a brief orientation and assignment of facilities with the group.

The DSC operates on a “self-housekeeping” basis; guests are required to follow the posted clean up procedures in their dorm rooms before departure and help keep dining and other common use areas clean during their stay, including any kitchen facilities they are permitted to use. This is a requirement. Please include time for clean up when planning your itinerary. Pets are not allowed at the DSC, and University and National Park Service regulations prohibit the possession of firearms. DSC buildings are a no smoking facility, however guests may smoke outdoors, away from the buildings, and use the butt receptacles provided.

The Desert Studies Center is located within the Mojave National Preserve, and encompasses several sensitive habitats, archaeological and historical sites, and a pond and spring containing Mojave Tui Chub, an endangered fish. Therefore, please do no collect any material, plants or animals without prior authorization and do not wade or throw anything into the ponds. The Manager reserves the right to remove any guest from the DSC whose conduct interferes with other guests or conflicts with the goals and purposes of the Desert Studies Center.

Safety Considerations

The rugged and wild nature of the Mojave Desert requires attention to certain safety issues. During warmer months, adequate precautions must be taken to avoid dehydration and sunstroke. Carry plenty of water and wear a hat. Due diligence in avoiding unwanted encounters with scorpions, black widows and rattlesnakes is required. No person should hike alone without knowing the terrain or without notifying a group member or the DSC staff about his or her route and return time. Abandoned mine workings should be avoided. Groups traveling in the field are required to carry a first aid kit.

If vehicle travel in remote areas is required, proper precautions should be made against mechanical breakdown or getting stuck in mud or sand, and contingencies should be planned if they occur. Caravans should have procedures to ensure that no vehicles get separated from the group. If you have any questions about appropriate safety precautions/procedures, or in the event of illness, injury or other medical emergencies while at the DSC, contact the Manager who will assist you.

 

Biology

Birds

DESERT STUDIES CENTER
ZZYZX, CALIFORNIA
EAST MOJAVE DESERT
AUGUST, 2007

M = Migrant (Spring and/or Fall)
S = Summer Resident (Breeds)
W = Winter Resident
Y = Year-round Resident (Breeds)
* = Accidental (Documentation Required)

Ducks, Geese & Swans (Anatidae)
 
Greater White-fronted Goose
M
Snow Goose
M
Ross’s Goose
M*
Canada Goose
MW
Tundra Swan
M
Wood Duck
M
Mallard
MW
Gadwall
MW
Green-winged Teal
MW
American Wigeon
MW
Northern Pintail
MW
Northern Shoveler
MW
Blue-winged Teal
M
Cinnamon Teal
MW
Canvasback
MW
Redhead
MW
Ring-necked Duck
MW
Lesser Scaup
MW

 

 

Common Goldeneye
M*
Bufflehead
MW
Red-breasted Merganser
M*
Hooded Merganser
M*
Ruddy Duck
MW
Partridges & Old World Quail (Phasianidae)
 
Chukar
Y
New World Quail (Odontophoridae)
 
Gambel’s Quail
Y
Loons (Gaviidae)
 
Common Loon
M*
Grebes (Podicipedidae)
 
Pied-billed Grebe
Y
Eared Grebe
M
Western Grebe
M
Pelicans (Pelecanidae)
 
American White Pelican
M
Brown Pelican
M*

 

 

Cormorants (Phalacrocoracidae)
 
Double-crested Cormorant
M
Herons, Bitterns & Egrets (Ardeidae)
 
American Bittern
M
Least Bittern
M*
Yellow-crowned Night-Heron
M*
Black-crowned Night-Heron
M
Green Heron
M
Cattle Egret
M
Snowy Egret
M
Great Egret
M
Great Blue Heron
M
Ibises (Threskiornithidae)
 
White-faced Ibis
M
New World Vultures (Cathartidae)
 
Turkey Vulture
M

 

 

Hawks, Kites, & Eagles (Accipitridae)
 
Osprey
M
Northern Harrier
M
Golden Eagle
Y
Sharp-shinned Hawk
MW
Cooper’s Hawk
MW
Red-shouldered Hawk
M
Red-tailed Hawk
Y
Swainson’s Hawk
M
Rough-legged Hawk
M
Ferruginous Hawk
X
Falcons (Falconidae)
 
American Kestrel
Y
Merlin
MW
Prairie Falcon
Y
Peregrine Falcon
M
Rails, Gallinules & Coots (Rallidae)
 
Virginia Rail
M
Sora
M
Purple Gallinule
M*
Common Moorhen
M
American Coot
Y

 

 

Plovers (Charadriidae)
 
Semipalmated Plover
M
Killdeer
Y
Stilts & Avocets (Recurvirostridae)
 
American Avocet
M
Black-necked Stilt
M
Sandpipers & Phalaropes (Scolopacidae)
 
Willet
M
Lesser Yellowlegs
M
Greater Yellowlegs
M
Solitary Sandpiper
M
Spotted Sandpiper
M
Western Sandpiper
M
Least Sandpiper
M
Baird’s Sandpiper
M
Long-billed Dowitcher
M
Wilson’s Snipe
M
Wilson’s Phalarope
M
Red-necked Phalarope
M

 

 

Gulls, Terns & Skimmers (Laridae)
 
Heermann’s Gull
M*
Bonaparte’s Gull
M
Ring-billed Gull
M
California Gull
M
Least Tern
M*
Forster’s Tern
M
Black Tern
M
Pigeons & Doves (Columbidae)
 
Rock Pigeon
Y
Mourning Dove
Y
Eurasian Collared-Dove
Y
White-winged Dove
S
Common Ground-Dove
 
Ruddy Ground-Dove
M*
Cuckoos, Roadrunners & Anis (Cuculidae)
 
Greater Roadrunner
Y
Groove-billed Ani
M*
Barn Owls (Tytonidae)
 
Barn Owl
Y
Typical Owls (Strigidae)
 
Long-eared Owl
Y
Great-horned Owl
Y

 

 

Goatsuckers (Caprimulgidae)
 
Lesser Nighthawk
S
Common Poorwill
S
Swifts (Apodidae)
 
Vaux’s Swift
M
White-throated Swift
Y
Hummingbirds (Trochilidae)
 
Black-chinned Hummingbird
S
Costa’s Hummingbird
S
Anna’s Hummingbird
S
Calliope Hummingbird
M
Rufous Hummingbird
M
Kingfishers (Alcedinidae)
 
Belted Kingfisher
Y

 

 

Woodpeckers (Picidae)
 
Acorn Woodpecker
M*
Lewis’s Woodpecker
M
Willow Flycatcher
M
Northern Flicker “Yellow-shafted”
M*
Northern Flicker “Red-shafted”
MW
Red-breasted Sapsucker
MW
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker
M*
Red-naped Sapsucker
MW
Ladder-backed Woodpecker
Y
Tyrant Flycatchers (Tyrannidae)
 
Olive-sided Flycatcher
M
Western Wood-Pewee
M
Willow Flycatcher
M
Hammond’s Flycatcher
M
Gray Flycatcher
M
Dusky Flycatcher
M
Pacific-slope Flycatcher
M
Black Phoebe
Y
Say’s Phoebe
Y

 

 

Vermillion Flycatcher
S
Ash-throated Flycatcher
M
Cassin’s Kingbird
M
Western Kingbird
M
Eastern Kingbird
M
Shrikes (Laniidae)
 
Loggerhead Shrike
 
Vireos (Vireonidae)
 
Bell’s Vireo
M
Plumbeous Vireo
M
Cassin’s Vireo
M
Red-eyed Vireo
M*
Warbling Vireo
M
Crows and Jays (Corvidae)
 
Western Scrub-Jay
M
American Crow
M*
Common Raven
Y

 

 

Larks (Alaudidae)
 
Horned Lark
Y
Swallows (Hirundinidae)
 
Tree Swallow
M
Violet-green Swallow
M
Bank Swallow
M
Cliff Swallow
M
N. Rough-winged Swallow
M
Barn Swallow
M
Verdins (Remizidae)
 
Verdin
Y
Creepers (Certhiidae)
 
Brown Creeper
M
Nuthatches (Sittidae)
 
Red-breasted Nuthatch
M
Wrens (Troglodytidae)
 
House Wren
M
Bewick’s Wren
M
Cactus Wren
Y
Rock Wren
Y
Canyon Wren
Y
Marsh Wren
Y
Winter Wren
Y

 

 

Kinglets (Regulidae)
 
Golden-crowned Kinglet
M
Ruby-crowned Kinglet
MW
Gnatcatchers (Sylviidae)
 
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
M
Black-tailed Gnatcatcher
Y
Thrushes (Turdidae)
 
Western Bluebird
M
Mountain Bluebird
M
Townsend’s Solitaire
M
Swainson’s Thrush
M
Hermit Thrush
MW
Varied Thrush
MW*
American Robin
MW
Mockingbirds & Thrashers (Mimidae)
 
Northern Mockingbird
Y
Sage Thrasher
M
Starlings (Sturnidae)
 
European Starling
Y
Wagtails & Pipits (Motacillidae)
 
American Pipit
M
Waxwings (Bombycillidae)
 
Cedar Waxwing
MW
Silky-flycatchers (Ptilogonatidae)
 
Phainopepla
Y

 

 

Wood-Warblers (Parulidae)
 
Prothonotary Warbler
M*
Tennessee Warbler
M*
Orange-crowned Warbler
M
Nashville Warbler
M
Virginia’s Warbler
M*
Lucy’s Warbler
S
Yellow-rumped Warbler
MW
Black-and-white Warbler
M*
Black-throated Gray Warbler
M
Townsend’s Warbler
M
Hermit Warbler
M
Blackpoll Warlber
M
Yellow Warbler
M
MacGillivray’s Warbler
M
Canada Warbler
M*
Wilson’s Warbler
M
Hooded Warbler
M*
Ovenbird
M*
Northern Waterthrush
M
Common Yellowthroat
Y
Yellow-breasted Chat
M
American Redstart
M*
Painted Redstart
M*
Tanagers (Thraupidae)
 
Hepatic Tanager
M*
Summer Tanager
M
Scarlet Tanager
M*
Western Tanager
M

 

 

Sparrows & Towhees (Emberizidae)
 
Green-tailed Towhee
M
Eastern Towhee
M*
Spotted Towhee
M
American Tree Sparrow
M*
Chipping Sparrow
MW
Brewer’s Sparrow
M
Lark Sparrow
M
Black-throated Sparrow
Y
Sage Sparrow
MW
Fox Sparrow
MW
Savannah Sparrow
MW
Lincoln’s Sparrow
MW
Song Sparrow
MW
Vesper Sparrow
MW
Swamp Sparrow
M*
Harris’s Sparrow
MW*
White-throated Sparrow
M*
White-crowned Sparrow
MW
Golden-crowned Sparrow
MW
Dark-eyed Junco
MW

 

 

Cardinals, Grosbeaks & Buntings (Cardinalidae)
 
Rose-breasted Grosbeak
M*
Black-headed Grosbeak
M
Blue Grosbeak
M
Indigo Bunting
M*
Lazuli Bunting
M
Blackbirds & Orioles (Icteridae)
 
Western Meadowlark
M
Yellow-headed Blackbird
M
Tricolored Blackbird
M
Red-winged Blackbird
Y
Great-tailed Grackle
Y
Brewer’s Blackbird
Y
Brown-headed Cowbird
Y
Hooded Oriole
M
Bullock’s Oriole
M
Streak-backed Oriole
M*
Scott’s Oriole
M
Finches (Fringillidae)
 
Purple Finch
M*
House Finch
Y
Pine Siskin
MW
American Goldfinch
MW
Lesser Goldfinch
Y
Lawrence’s Goldfinch
M
Evening Grosbeak
M
Old World Sparrows (Passeridae)
 
House Sparrow
M

Taxonomy and Nomenclature follows the 7th edition of the
American Ornithologists’ Union Checklist
of North American Birds (1997) and the 47th Supplement (2006).
CALIFORNIA DESERT STUDIES CENTER
CONTRIBUTION NUMBER SERIES #64

 


 

Mammals

ORDER
Family
Species
Common Name
ARTIODACTYLA
Cervidae
Odocoileus hemionus
Mule Deer
ARTIODACTYLA
Bovidae
Ovis canadensis
Desert Bighorn
CARNIVORA
Canidae
Canis latrans
Coyote
CARNIVORA
Canidae
Urocyon cinereoargenteus
Common Gray Fox
CARNIVORA
Canidae
Vulpes macrotis
Kit Fox
CARNIVORA
Felidae
Puma concolor
Cougar
CARNIVORA
Felidae
Felis rufus
Bobcat
CARNIVORA
Mephitidae
Mephitis mephitis
Striped Skunk
CARNIVORA
Mephitidae
Spilogale gracilis
Western Spotted Skunk
CARNIVORA
Mustelidae
Taxidea taxus
American Badger
CARNIVORA
Procyonidae
Bassariscus astutus
Ringtail
CARNIVORA
Procyonidae
Procyon lotor
Northern Raccoon
CHIROPTERA
Molossidae
Eumpos perotis
Western Mastiff Bat
CHIROPTERA
Molossidae
Tadarida brasiliensis
Brazilian Freetailed Bat
CHIROPTERA
Vespertilionidae
Antrozous pallidus
Pallid Bat
CHIROPTERA
Vespertilionidae
Euderma maculatum
Spotted Bat
CHIROPTERA
Vespertilionidae
Eptesicus fuscus
Big Brown Bat
CHIROPTERA
Vespertilionidae
Lasiurus cinereus
Hoary Bat
CHIROPTERA
Vespertilionidae
Myotis californicus
California Myotis
CHIROPTERA
Vespertilionidae
Myotis cilioabrum
Western Small-footed Bat
CHIROPTERA
Vespertilionidae
Myotis evotis
Long-eared Myotis
CHIROPTERA
Vespertilionidae
Myotis thysanodes
Fringed Myotis
ORDER
Family
Genus species
Common Name
CHIROPTERA
Vespertilionidae
Myotis volans
Long-legged Myotis
CHIROPTERA
Vespertilionidae
Myotis yumanensis
Yuma Myotis
CHIROPTERA
Vespertilionidae
Pipistrellus hesperus
Western Pipistrelle
CHIROPTERA
Vespertilionidae
Corynorhinus townsendii
Townsend's Big-eared Bat
SORICOMORPHA
Soricidae
Notiosorex crawfordi
Crawford's Gray Shrew
LAGOMORPHA
Leporidae
Lepus californicus
Blacktail Jackrabbit
LAGOMORPHA
Leporidae
Sylvilagus audubonii
Desert Cottontail
RODENTIA
Cricetidae
Neotoma lepida
Desert Woodrat
RODENTIA
Cricetidae
Onychomys torridus
Southern Grasshopper Mouse
RODENTIA
Cricetidae
Peromyscus boylii
Bush Mouse
RODENTIA
Cricetidae
Peromyscus crinitus
Canyon Mouse
RODENTIA
Cricetidae
Peromyscus eremicus
Cactus Mouse
RODENTIA
Cricetidae
Peromyscus maniculatus
Deer Mouse
RODENTIA
Cricetidae
Peromyscus truei
Pinyon Mouse
RODENTIA
Cricetidae
Reithrodontomys megalotis
Western Harvest Mouse
RODENTIA
Geomyidae
Thomomys bottae
Botta's Pocket Gopher
RODENTIA
Heteromyidae
Chaetodipus formosus
Long Tailed Pocket Mouse
RODENTIA
Heteromyidae
Chaetodipus penicillatus
Desert Pocket Mouse
RODENTIA
Heteromyidae
Chaetodipus spinatus
Spiny Pocket Mouse
ORDER
Family
Genus species
Common Name
RODENTIA
Heteromyidae
Dipodomys deserti
Desert Kangaroo Rat
RODENTIA
Heteromyidae
Dipodomys merriami
Merriam Kangaroo Rat
RODENTIA
Heteromyidae
Perognathus longimembris
Little Pocket Mouse
RODENTIA
Heteromyidae
Dipodomys panamintinus
Panamint Kangaroo Rat
RODENTIA
Muridae
Mus musculus
House Mouse
RODENTIA
Sciuridae
Ammospermophilius leucurus
White-tail Antelope Squirrel
RODENTIA
Sciuridae
Spermophilus tereticaudus
Round-Tailed Ground Squirrel

 

 


 

Plants

+ - Common names from Edmund Jaeger's Desert Wild Flowers
* - Common names from LeRoy Abram's Illustrated Flora of the Pacific States
** Introduced Species
EPHEDRALES
EPHEDRACEAE EPHEDRA FAMILY
Ephedra nevedensis *Nevada Ephedra, + Nevada Joint Fir
DICOTYLEDONES
AIZOACEAE CARPET-WEED FAMILY
Sesuvium verrucosum *Western Sea-purslane
Trianthema portulacastrum *Horse-purslane, +Lowland Purslane
AMARANTHACEAE AMARANTH FAMILY
Tidestromia oblongifolia *Arizona Honey-sweet, +Honey-sweet
APOCYNACEAE DOGBANE FAMILY
**Nerium oleander +Oleander
ASCLEPIADACEAE MILKWEED FAMILY
Asclepias erosa +Desert Milkweed
Sarcostemma cynanchoides hartwegii
*Climbing-milkweed,Townula, +PurpleClimbing-milkweed
ASTERACEAE SUNFLOWER FAMILY
Ambrosia dumosa *White Bur-sage, +Burrobush
Amphipappus fremontii spinosus *Chaffbush, +Eytelia
Aster subulatus ligulatus *Slim Aster
Baileya pauciradiata *Colorado Desert-marigold, +Lax-flower
 
 
Baileya pleniradiata *+Woolly-marigold
Bebbia juncea asper *+Sweetbush
Brickellia incana *Woolly Brickellia, Brickelbush, +Woolly Brickellia
Chaenactis carphoclinia carphoclinia *+Pebble-pincushion
Chaenactis fremontii *+Fremont-pincushion
Chaenactis stevioides *Broad-flowered Chaenactis +Esteve-pincushion
**Chamomilla suaveolens *Pineapple Weed
Dicoria canescens *+Desert Dicoria
Encelia farinosa *+Brittlebush, Incienso
Encelia frutescens *Bush Encelia, +Rayless Encelia
Eriophyllum ambiguum *Woolly-daisy, +Yellow-frocks
Filago depressa *+Dwarf Filago
Geraea canescens *+Desert-sunflower
Helianthus annuus jaegeri *Common Sunflower, +Annual Sunflower
Hymenoclea salsola salsola *White Burrobush, +Cheesebush
Isocoma acradenia ermophila *Desert Isocoma, +Alkali Goldenbush
Machaeranthera arida *+Silver Lake-daisy
Machaeranthera carnosa *Shrubby Alkali-Aster
 
 
Malacothrix coulteri *+Snakes-head
Malacothrix glabrata *+Desert-dandelion
Monoptilon bellioides *+Mojave Desert-star
Palafoxia arida arida *+Spanish-needle
Pectis papposa papposa +Chinch-weed
Perityle emoryi *+Emory Rock-daisy
Perityle emoryi *+Emory Rock-daisy
Peucephyllum schottii *+Desert-fir, Pigmy-cedar
Pleurocoronis pluriseta *+Arrow Leaf
Pluchea sericea *+Arrow Weed
Prenanthella exigua *Annual Lygdesemia, +Egbertia
Psathyrotes annnua *Mealy Rosettes, +Fan-leaf
Rafinesquia neomexicana *+Desert-chicory
Senecio mohavensis *+Mojave Groundsel
Stephanomeria exigua exigua *Small Stephanomeria, +Annual Mitra
Stephanomeria parryi *Parry's Stephanomeria, +Parry Rock-pink
Stephanomeria pauciflora *Few-flowered
Stephanomeria, Wire lettuce, +Desert-straw
 
 
Stylocline micropoides *Woolly Stylocline, Desert Nest-straw,+Desert Nest-straw
Xylorhiza tortifolia tortifolia *Mojave-aster
BORAGINACEAE BORAGE FAMILY
Amsinckia tessellata tessellata *Tessellate Fiddleneck, +Checker Fiddleneck
Cryptantha angustifolia +Narrow-leaved Forget-Me-Not
Cryptantha decipens *Gravel Cryptantha, +Gravel Forget-Me-Not
Crythantha maritima *Guadalupe Crypthantha, +White-haired Forget-Me-Not
Cryptantha micrantha *Eremocarya, +Purple-rooted Forget-Me-Not
Cryptantha nevadensis *Nevada Crypthantha, +Nevada Forget-Me-Not
Crypthantha pterocarya cycloptera *Wing-nut
Crypthantha,+Wing-Nut,Forget-Me-Not
Heliotropium curassavicum *Seaside Heliotrope, +Chinese-pusley
Pectocarya heterocarpa *Chuckwalla Pectocarya
Pectocarya platycarpa *Broad-fruited Pectocarya, +Broad-nutted Combbur
Pectocarya recurvata *Recurved Pectocarya, +Arched-nutted Combbur
Plagiobothrys jonesii *Jone's Plagiobothrys, +Jone's Popcorn-flower
Tiquilia plicata *+Plicate Coldenia
 
 
BRASSICACEAE MUSTARD FAMILY
Caulanthus cooperi *+Cooper's Caulanthus
Descurainia californica *Sierra Tansy-mustard, *+California Tansymustard
**Descurainia sophia *Flixweed, Tansy-mustard, *+Sophia Tansy-mustard
Dithyrea californica *California Shield-pod, +Spectacle-pod
Guillenia lasiophyllum *California-mustard
Lepidium lasiocarpum lasiocarpum *Hairy-pod Pepper-grass
Streptanthella longirostris *Streptanthella, +Long-beaked Twistflower
CACTACEAE CACTUS FAMILY
Echinocactus polycephalus polycephalus *Cotton-top Cactus
Echinocereus engelmanii chrysocentrus *Saints' Cactus, +Calico Cactus
Mammillaria tetrancistra *Yaqui Cactus, +Corkseed Cactus
Opuntia basilaris basilaris *+Beaver-tail Cactus
Opuntia echinocarpa *Summer Cholla, +Thorny-fruited Cactus
CAPPARACEAE CAPPER FAMILY
Cleomella obtusifolia *Bushy Cleomella, +Blunt-leaf Stinkweed
CARYOPHYLLACEAE CHICKWEED FAMILY
Achyronychia cooperi *Onyx Flower, +Frost-mat, Chaff-nail
 
 
CHENOPODIACEAE GOOSEFOOT FAMILY
Allenrolfea occidentalis +Picklebush, Picklewood, *Iodine Bush
Atriplex canescens canescens *Hoary Saltbush, +Wingscale, Hoary Saltbush
Atriplex hymenelytra *+Desert-holly
Atriplex lentiformis lentiformis *Lens-fruited saltbush, Quail Brush, +Lenscale
Atriplex phyllostegia *Arrow Saltbush, +Arrow Scale
Atriplex polycarpa *Many-fruited Saltbush, Allscale, +Cattle-spinach
**Cycloloma atriplicifolium *Winged-pigweed
Nitrophila occidentalis *Nitrophila, +Alkali-weed
**Salsola tragus *Russian-thistle, +Russian-thistle, Prickly Saltwort
Suaeda moquinii *Salton Sea-blite, +Inkweed, Torrey Sea-blite
CUSCUTACEAE DODDER FAMILY
Cuscuta denticulata *DesertDodder, Toothed Dodder, +Toothed Dodder
EUPHORBIACEAE SPURGE FAMILY
Chamaesyce polycarpa hirtella *Golondrina, +Small-seed Sand-mat
Croton californica mohavensis *California Croton, +Desert Croton
Stillingia spinulosa *Annual Stillingia, +Broad-leaved Stillingia
 
 
FABACEAE PEA FAMILY
Astragalus lentiginosus fremontii *Mottled Rattleweed, +Dapple-pod
**Cercidium floridum floridum *+Border Palo Verde
**Cercidium floridum floridum *+Border Palo Verde
Dalea mollissima *Downy Dalea, +Silk Dalea
Lotus salsuginosus brevivexillus *Humble Hosackia, Annual Lotus
Lupinus arizonicus +Arizona Lupine
Lupinus brevicaulis Short-stemmed Platycarpos, Short-stemmed Blue Lupine
**Parkinsonia aculeata *Palo Verde
Prosopis glandulosa torreyana *+Mesquite
Prosopis pubescens *+Tornillo, Screw-bean
Psorothamnus spinosus *+Smoke Tree
GERANIACEAE GERANIUM FAMILY
**Erodium cicutarium *Red-Stemmed Filaree, +Filaree
Erodium texanum *Texas Filaree, +Desert Heron's-bill
HYDROPHYLLACEAE WATERLEAF FAMILY
Nama demissum demissum *+Purple Mat
Phacelia crenulata crenulata *Heliotrope Phacelia, +Notch-leaved Phacelia
 
 
LOASACEAE STICK-LEAF FAMILY
Mentzelia albicaulis *White-stemmed Stick-leaf, +Small-flowered Blazing star
Mentzelia multiflora longiloba *Yerba Amarilla, +Adonis, Blazing Star, Panamint Blazing Star
Petalonyx thurberi thurberi *Common Sandpaper Plant,+Thurber Sandpaper Plant
MALVACEAE MALLOW FAMILY
Eremalche exilis *+White-mallow
Eremalche rotundifolia *Desert Five-spot,+Desert Five-spot, Chinese Lantern
NYCTAGINACEAE FOUR-O'CLOCK FAMILY
Abronia villosa villosa *Desert Sand-verbena, +Hairy Sand-verbena
Allionia incarnata *Allionia, Windmills, +Windmills
Mirabilis bigelovii retrorsa *Desert Four-O'Clock, Wishbone Bush, +Wishbone Bush
ONAGRACEAE EVENING-PRIMROSE FAMILY
Camissonia boothii intermedia *+Booth's-primrose
Camissonia brevipes brevipes *Desert-primrose, +Yellow Cups
Camissonia brevipes pallidula *Desert-primrose, +Yellow Cups
Camissonia claviformis aurantiaca *Clavate-fruited primrose, +Brown-eyed primrose
Camissonia claviformis lancifolia *Clavate-fruited primrose, +Browneyed primrose
Camissonia claviformis x brevipes *Clavate-fruited primrose, +Browneyed primrose
 
 
Camissonia refracta *Refracted Desert primrose, +Narrow-leaved primrose
Oenothera deltoides deltoides *Large Desert Evening-primrose, +Dune primrose
OROBANCHACEAE BROOMRAPE FAMILY
Orobanche cooperi *Cooper's Broomrape, Desert Broomrape, +Burro-weed Strangler
PAPAVERACEAE POPPY FAMILY
Argemone corymbosa* Leafy Prickly Poppy, +Prickly Poppy
Eschscholzia minutiflora *Pygmy-poppy, +Little Gold-poppy
Eschscholzia glyptospera *Mojave Poppy, +Desert Gold-poppy
PLANTAGINACEAE PLANTAIN FAMILY
Plantago ovata (incl.P.insularis fastigiata) *Island Plantain, +Woolly Plantain
POLEMONACEA PHLOX FAMILY
Gilia filiformis *Thin Gilia, *+Thread-stemmed Gilia
Gilia latifolia *+Broad-leaved Gilia
Langloisia setosissima punctata *Spotted Langloisia, Lilac Sunbonnet, +Spotted Gilia
Linanthus demissus *Desert Linanthus, +Humble Gilia
Linanthus jonesii *Jone's Linanthus
Loeseliastrum matthewsii *+Desert Calico
 
 
POLYGONACEAE BUCKWHEAT FAMILY
Chorizanthe brevicornu brevicornu *+Brittle Chorizanthe, Spine Flower
Chorizanthe corrugata *Wrinkled Chorizanthe, Spine Flower, +Corrugata
Chorizanthe rigida *Rigid Chorizanthe, Spiny-herb, +Rigid Spinyherb
Eriogonum brachypodum *Flat-crown Eriogonum, +Tecopa Skeleton Weed
Eriogonum inflatum inflatum *+Desert-trumpet
Eriogonum pusillum *Puny Eriogonum, +Yellow Turban
Eriogonum thomasii *+Thomas's Eriogonum
Eriogonum trichopes trichopes *Yellow Trumpet, **Little Trumpet
RESEDACEAE MIGNONETTE FAMILY
Oligomeris linifolia *Oligomeris, +Linear-leaved Cambess
RUBIACEAE BEDSTRAW FAMILY
Galium stellatum eremicum *+Desert Bedstraw
SAURURACEAE LIZARD'S-TAIL FAMILY
Anemopsis californica *Yerba Mansa
SCROPHULARIACEAE FIGWORT FAMILY
Mimulus bigelovii bigelovii *Bigelow's Monkey-flower, +Bigelow Mimulus
Mimulus bigelovii cuspidatus *Bigelow's Monkey-flower, +Bigelow Mimulus
Mohavea breviflora *Golden Desert Snapdragon, +Lesser Mohavea
 
 
SOLANACEAE POTATO FAMILY
Physalis crassifolia *+Thick-leaved Ground-cherry
TAMARICACEAE TAMARIX FAMILY
**Tamarix aphylla Tamarisk, Athel
**Tamarix ramosissima Tamarisk
VISCACEAE MISTLETOE FAMILY
Phoradendron californicum *California Mistletoe, +Desert Mistletoe
ZYGOPHYLLACEAE CALTROP FAMILY
Larrea tridentata *Cresote Bush, +Cresote Bush, Covillea
Tribulus terrestris *Land Caltrop, Puncture Weed
MONOCOTYLEDONES
ARECACEAE PALM FAMILY
**Phoenix reclinata Sengelese Date Palm
**Washingtonia filifera +Desert Palm, California Fan Palm
**Washingtonia robusta Mexican Fan Pal
 
Nomenclature conforms to the Jepson Manual Higher Plants of California, 1993, Editor, James C. Hickman.
List prepared by Alan Romspert, Coordinator, Desert Studies California Desert Studies Center.
Contribution Number Series #66.
 

 

 


 

Amphibians and Reptiles

ORDER
Family
Species
Common name
ANURA
Hylidae
Pseudacris hypochondriaca
Baja California Tree Frog
Testudines
Testudinidae
Gopherus agassizii
Desert Tortoise
SAURIA
Crotaphytidae
Crotaphytus bicinctores
Great Basin Collared Lizard
SAURIA
Crotaphytidae
Gambilia wislizenii
Long-nosed Leopard Lizard
SAURIA
Eublepharidae
Coleonyx variegatus
Western Banded Gecko
SAURIA
Iguanidae
Dipsosaurus dorsalis
Desert Iguana
SAURIA
Iguanidae
Sauromalus ater
Common Chuckwalla
SAURIA
Phrynosomatidae
Callisaurus draconoides
Zebra-tailed Lizard
SAURIA
Phrynosomatidae
Phrynosoma platyrhinos
Desert Horned Lizard
SAURIA
Phrynosomatidae
Uma scoparia
Mojave Fringed-toed Lizard
SAURIA
Phrynosomatidae
Urosaurus graciosus
Long-tailed Brush Lizard
SAURIA
Phrynosomatidae
Uta stansburiana
Common Side-blotched Lizard
SAURIA
Teiidae
Aspidoscelis tigris
Tiger Whiptail Lizard
SAURIA
Xantusiidae
Xantusia vigilis
Desert Night Lizard
SERPENTES
Colubridae
Arizona occipitalis
California Glossy Snake
SERPENTES
Colubridae
Chionactis occipitalis
Wesert Shovel-nosed Snake
SERPENTES
Colubridae
Hypsiglena ochrorhyncha
Coast Night Snake
ORDER
Family
Genus species
Common name
SERPENTES
Colubridae
Lampropeltis getula
Common Kingsnake
SERPENTES
Colubridae
Masticophis flagellum
Coachwhip
SERPENTES
Colubridae
Phyllorhynchus decurtatus
Spotted Leaf-nosed Snake
SERPENTES
Colubridae
Pituophis catenifer
Gopher Snake
SERPENTES
Colubridae
Rhinocheilus lecontei
Long-nosed Snake
SERPENTES
Colubridae
Salvadora hexalepis
Western Patch-nosed Snake
SERPENTES
Colubridae
Sonora semiannulata
Western Groundsnake
SERPENTES
Colubridae
Tantilla horbartsmithi
Smith's Black-headed Snake
SERPENTES
Viperidae
Crotalus cerastes
Sidewinder
SERPENTES
Viperidae
Crotalus mitchellii
Speckled Rattlesnake
SERPENTES
Viperidae
Crotalus scutulatus
Mojave Rattlesnake
SERPENTES
Leptotyphlopidae
Leptotyphlops humilis
Western Threadsnake

 


 

Fish

Cyprinodon nevadensis nevadensis
Saratoga Springs Pupfish
Gambusia affinis
Mosquito fish
Gila bicolor mohavensis
Mojave Tui Chub (listed endangered subspecies)

 


 

Insects

Catalogued Insects
Desert Studies Center
March, 2002
Compiled by Alan Romspert, Emeritus
California State University, Fullerton
Order
Family
Subfamily
Genus
Subgenus
Species
Subspecies
Odonata
Aesnidae
Aeshna
multicolor
Odonata
Aeshnidae
Anax
junius
Odonata
Aeshnidae
Anax
junius
Odonata
Libellulidae
Belonia
saturata
Odonata
Libellulidae
Belonia
saturata
Odonata
Libellulidae
Mesothemis
simplicollis
Odonata
Libellulidae
Mesothemis
simplicollis
Odonata
Libellulidae
Pachydiplax
longimembris
Odonata
Libellulidae
Tarnetrum
corruptum
Odonata
Libellulidae
Libellula
luctuosa
Odonata
Libellulidae
Tramea
lacerata
Odonata
Libellulidae
Tramea
lacerata
Odonata
Libellulidae
Tramea
onusta
Odonata
Libellulidae
Tramea
inusta
Odonata
Coenagrionidae
Undetermined
Odonata
Coenagrionidae
Enallegma
spp
Odonata
Coenagrionidae
Telebasis
salva
Order
Family
Subfamily
Genus
Subgenus
Species
Subspecies
Orthoptera
Blattellidae
Undetermined
Orthoptera
Acrididae
Undetermined
Orthoptera
Tettigonidae
Undetermined
Orthoptera
Polyphagidae
Undetermined
Orthoptera
Blattidae
Undetermined
Orthoptera
Gryllidae
Undetermined
Orthoptera
Mantidae
Undetermined
Orthoptera
Phasmidae
Undetermined
Hemiptera
Undetermined
Hemiptera
Corixidae
Undetermined
Hemiptera
Notonectidae
Undetermined
Hemiptera
Naucoridae
Undetermined
Hemiptera
Gelastocoridae
Gelastocoris
oculatus
Hemiptera
Gelastocoridae
Gelastocoris
oculatus
Hemiptera
Anthocoridae
Undetermined
Hemiptera
Miridae
Undetermined
Hemiptera
Coreidae
Undetermined
Order
Family
Subfamily
Genus
Subgenus
Species
Subspecies
Hemiptera
Coreidae
Leptoglossus
clypealis
Hemiptera
Reduviidae
Undetermined
Hemiptera
Reduviidae
Apiomerus
cazieri
Hemiptera
Reduviidae
Apiomerus
cazieri
Hemiptera
Reduviidae
Apiomerus
crassipes
Hemiptera
Reduviidae
Rhinocoris
ventralis
Hemiptera
Reduviidae
Zelus
tetracanthus
Hemiptera
Reduviidae
Zelus
tetracanthus
Hemiptera
Reduviidae
Zelus
tetracanthus
Hemiptera
Tingidae
Corythucha
mamorata
Hemiptera
Lygaeidae
Undetermined
Hemiptera
Lygaeidae
Melanopleura
belfragei
Hemiptera
Lygaeidae
Lygaeus
kalmii
Hemiptera
Lygaeidae
Lygaeus
kalmii
Hemiptera
Lygaeidae
Ochrimnus
spp
Hemiptera
Lygaeidae
Ochrimnus
spp.
Hemiptera
Lygaeidae
Ochrimnus
spp.
 
 
Order
Family
Subfamily
Genus
Subgenus
Species
Subspecies
Hemiptera
Lygaeidae
Pachybrachus
spp
Hemiptera
Lygaeidae
Pachybrachus
spp
Hemiptera
Berytidae
Undetermined
Hemiptera
Rhopalidae
Undetermined
Hemiptera
Pentatomidae
Undetermined
Hemiptera
Cydnidae
Undetermined
Hemiptera
Cicadidae
Undetermined
Hemiptera
Cicadellidae
Undetermined
Hemiptera
Fulgoridae
Undetermined
Hemiptera
Aphidae
Undetermined
Hemiptera
Orthoziidae
Undetermined
Neuroptera
Hemerobiidae
Undetermined
Neuroptera
Hemerobiidae
Hemerobius
spp.
Neuroptera
Hemerobiidae
Sympherobius
spp.
Neuroptera
Chrysopidae
Chrysoperla
spp.
Neuroptera
Chrysopidae
Chrysoperla
spp.
Neuroptera
Chrysopidae
Chrysoperla
spp
Order
Family
Subfamily
Genus
Subgenus
Species
Subspecies
Neuroptera
Myrmeleontidae
Undetermined
Neuroptera
Chrysopidae
Chrysoperla
spp.
Neuroptera
Chrysopidae
Chrysoperla
spp.
Neuroptera
Chrysopidae
Eremochrysa
fraterna
Neuroptera
Chrysopidae
Eremochrysa
punctinervus
Neuroptera
Chrysopidae
Eremochrysa
punctinervus
Neuroptera
Chrysopidae
Eremochrysa
punctinervus
Neuroptera
Chrysopidae
Eremochrysa
punctinervus
Neuroptera
Chrysopidae
Eremochrysa
punctinervus
Neuroptera
Chrysopidae
Eremochrysa
tibialis
Neuroptera
Chrysopidae
Eremochrysa
tibialis
Coleoptera
Cicindelidae
Cicindela
oregona
oregona
Coleoptera
Cicindelidae
Cicindela
willistoni
echo
Coleoptera
Cicindelidae
Cicindela
willistoni
echo
Coleoptera
Cicindelidae
Cicindela
willistoni
echo
Coleoptera
Cicindelidae
Cicindela
willistoni
echo
Coleoptera
Cicindelidae
Cicindela
willistoni
echo
Order
Family
Subfamily
Genus
Subgenus
Species
Subspecies
Coleoptera
Cicindelidae
Cicindela
willistoni
echo
Coleoptera
Cicindelidae
Cicindela
willistoni
echo
Coleoptera
Cicindelidae
Cicindela
willistoni
echo
Coleoptera
Cicindelidae
Cicindela
willistoni
echo
Coleoptera
Cicindelidae
Cicindela
willistoni
echo
Coleoptera
Cicindelidae
Cicindela
tranquebarica
arida
Coleoptera
Cicindelidae
Cicindela
tranquebarica
arida
Coleoptera
Cicindelidae
Cicindela
tranquebarica
arida
Coleoptera
Cicindelidae
Cicindela
willistoni
praedicta
Coleoptera
Cicindelidae
Cicindela
willistoni
praedicta
Coleoptera
Cicindelidae
Cicindela
willistoni
praedicta
Coleoptera
Cicindelidae
Cicindela
willistoni
pseudosenilis
Coleoptera
Cicindelidae
Cicindela
willistoni
pseudosenilis
Coleoptera
Cicindelidae
Cicindela
senilis
amaragosae
Coleoptera
Cicindelidae
Cicindela
haemorrhagica
haemorrhagica
Coleoptera
Cicindelidae
Cicindela
haemorrhagica
haemorrhagica
Coleoptera
Cicindelidae
Cicindela
haemorrhagica
haemorrhagica
 
 
Order
Family
Subfamily
Genus
Subgenus
Species
Subspecies
Coleoptera
Cicindelidae
Cicindela
haemorrhagica
haemorrhagica
Coleoptera
Cicindelidae
Cicindela
haemorrhagica
haemorrhagica
Coleoptera pseudoerronea
Cicindelidae
Cicindela
californica
mojavix c.
Coleoptera pseudoerronea
Cicindelidae
Cicindela
californica
mojavix c.
Coleoptera pseudoerronea
Cicindelidae
Cicindela
californica
mojavix c.
Coleoptera pseudoerronea
Cicindelidae
Cicindela
californica
mojavix c.
Coleoptera pseudoerronea
Cicindelidae
Cicindela
californica
mojavix c.
Coleoptera pseudoerronea
Cicindelidae
Cicindela
californica
mojavix c.
Coleoptera pseudoerronea
Cicindelidae
Cicindela
californica
mojavix c.
Coleoptera pseudoerronea
Cicindelidae
Cicindela
californica
mojavix c.
Coleoptera pseudoerronea
Cicindelidae
Cicindela
californica
mojavix c.
Coleoptera
Cicindelidae
Cicindela
nevadica
nevadica
Coleoptera
Cicindelidae
Cicindela
nevadica
nevadica
Coleoptera
Cicindelidae
Cicindela
nevadica
nevadica
Coleoptera
Cicindelidae
Cicindela
nevadica
nevadica
Coleoptera
Cicindelidae
Cicindela
nevadica
nevadica
Coleoptera
Cicindelidae
Cicindela
nevadica
nevadica
Order
Family
Subfamily
Genus
Subgenus
Species
Subspecies
Coleoptera
Cicindelidae
Cicindela
nigrocoerulea
nigrocoerulea
Coleoptera
Carabidae
Undetermined
Coleoptera
Carabidae
Bembidion
bifossolatum
Coleoptera
Carabidae
Calleida
sp.
Coleoptera
Carabidae
Calleida
sp.
Coleoptera
Carabidae
Calleida
sp.
Coleoptera
Carabidae
Calosoma
Camegonia
parvicollis
Coleoptera
Carabidae
Calosoma
Camegonia
parvicollis
Coleoptera
Carabidae
Calosoma
Camegonia
parvicollis
Coleoptera
Carabidae
Calosoma
Camegonia
parvicollis
Coleoptera
Carabidae
Calosoma
obsoletum
Coleoptera
Carabidae
Calosoma
Camedula
eremicola
Coleoptera
Carabidae
Lachnophorus
elegantulus
Coleoptera
Carabidae
Nebria
spp.
Coleoptera
Carabidae
Pterostichus
spp
Coleoptera
Carabidae
Scarites
subterraneus
Coleoptera
Dytiscidae
Undetermined
Order
Family
Subfamily
Genus
Subgenus
Species
Subspecies
Coleoptera
Hydrophilidae
Undetermined
Coleoptera
Histeridae
Undetermined
Coleoptera
Staphylinidae
Undetermined
Coleoptera
Staphylinidae
Aleocharinae
Coleoptera
Staphylinidae
Bledius
strenuus
Coleoptera
Staphylinidae
Carpelinius
#1
Coleoptera
Staphylinidae
Carpelinius
#2
Coleoptera
Staphylinidae
Carpelinius
#2
Coleoptera
Staphylinidae
Carpelinius
#3
Coleoptera
Staphylinidae
Carpelinius
#3
Coleoptera
Staphylinidae
Carpelinius
#4
Coleoptera
Staphylinidae
Carpelinius
#5
Coleoptera
Staphylinidae
Creophilus
maxillosus
Coleoptera
Leiodidae
Catops
basilaris
Coleoptera
Leiodidae
Catops
basilaris
Coleoptera
Leiodidae
Catops
basilaris
Coleoptera
Leiodidae
Catops
basilaris
 
 
Order
Family
Subfamily
Genus
Subgenus
Species
Subspecies
Coleoptera
Leiodidae
Catops
basilaris
Coleoptera
Leiodidae
Catops
basilaris
Coleoptera
Scydmaenidae
Undetermined
Coleoptera
Dascillidae
Undetermined
Coleoptera
Scarabaeidae
Undetermined
Coleoptera
Scarabaeidae
Aphodinae
Ataenius
desertus
Coleoptera
Scarabaeidae
Hybosorinae
Glaresis
ecostata
Coleoptera
Scarabaeidae
Geotrupinae
Bolbocerastes
regalis
Coleoptera
Scarabaeidae
Melonthinae
Cyclocephala
longula
Coleoptera
Scarabaeidae
Melonthinae
Cyclocephala
longula
Coleoptera
Scarabaeidae
Melonthinae
Diplotaxis
fimbriata
Coleoptera
Scarabaeidae
Melonthinae
Diplotaxis
knausi
Coleoptera
Scarabaeidae
Melonthinae
Diplotaxis
moerens
Coleoptera
Scarabaeidae
Melonthinae
Diplotaxis
moerens
Coleoptera
Scarabaeidae
Melonthinae
Diplotaxis
moerens
Coleoptera
Scarabaeidae
Melonthinae
Diplotaxis
moerens
Coleoptera
Scarabaeidae
Melonthinae
Diplotaxis
pacata
Order
Family
Subfamily
Genus
Subgenus
Species
Subspecies
Coleoptera
Scarabaeidae
Melonthinae
Diplotaxis
subangulata
Coleoptera
Scarabaeidae
Melonthinae
Diplotaxis
subangulata
Coleoptera
Scarabaeidae
Melonthinae
Ligyrus
gibbulus
obsoletus
Coleoptera
Scarabaeidae
Melonthinae
Ligyrus
gibbulus
obsoletus
Coleoptera
Scarabaeidae
Melonthinae
Ligyrus
gibbulus
obsoletus
Coleoptera
Scarabaeidae
Melonthinae
Ligyrus
gibbulus
obsoletus
Coleoptera
Scarabaeidae
Melonthinae
Ligyrus
gibbulus
obsoletus
Coleoptera
Scarabaeidae
Melonthinae
Ligyrus
gibbulus
obsoletus
Coleoptera
Scarabaeidae
Melonthinae
Ligyrus
gibbulus
obsoletus
Coleoptera
Scarabaeidae
Melonthinae
Ligyrus
gibbulus
obsoletus
Coleoptera
Scarabaeidae
Melonthinae
Ligyrus
gibbulus
obsoletus
Coleoptera
Scarabaeidae
Melonthinae
Serica
deserticus
Coleoptera
Scarabaeidae
Rutelinae
Chnaunanthus
chapini
Coleoptera
Scarabaeidae
Rutelinae
Chnaunanthus
chapini
Coleoptera
Scarabaeidae
Cetoninae
Gymnopyges
sp.
Coleoptera
Scarabaeidae
Cetoninae
Cremastocheilus
quadrulus
Coleoptera
Pselaphidae
Undetermined
Order
Family
Subfamily
Genus
Subgenus
Species
Subspecies
Coleoptera
Heteroceridae
Undetermined
Coleoptera
Buprestidae
Acmaeoderoides
humeralis
Coleoptera
Buprestidae
Anambodera
lucernae
Coleoptera
Buprestidae
Anambodera
lucernae
Coleoptera
Buprestidae
Anambodera
lucernae
Coleoptera
Buprestidae
Hippolemas
carolinensis
Coleoptera
Buprestidae
Hippolemas
carolinensis
Coleoptera
Buprestidae
Hippolemas
carolinensis
Coleoptera
Buprestidae
Hippolemas
obliteratus
Coleoptera
Buprestidae
Hippolemas
obliteratus
Coleoptera
Buprestidae
Hippolemas
obliteratus
Coleoptera
Buprestidae
Hippolemas
obliteratus
Coleoptera
Elateridae
Undetermined
Coleoptera
Carabidae
Pterostichus
spp
Coleoptera
Carabidae
Scarites
subterraneus
Coleoptera
Carabidae
Tetragonoderus
pallidus
Coleoptera
Carabidae
Tetragonoderus
pallidus
 
 
Order
Family
Subfamily
Genus
Subgenus
Species
Subspecies
Coleoptera
Carabidae
Tetragonoderus
pallidus
Coleoptera
Carabidae
Tetragonoderus
pallidus
Coleoptera
Carabidae
Tetragonoderus
pallidus
Coleoptera
Carabidae
Tetragonoderus
pallidus
Coleoptera
Carabidae
Tetragonoderus
pallidus
Coleoptera
Carabidae
Tetragonoderus
pallidus
Coleoptera
Carabidae
Tetragonoderus
pallidus
Coleoptera
Dermestidae
Undetermined
Coleoptera
Dermestidae
Undetermined
Coleoptera
Anobiidae
Anobiinae
Stegobium
paniceum
Coleoptera
Anobiinae
Tricoryninae
Tricorynus
gibbulus
pubescens
Coleoptera
Bostrichidae
Undetermined
Coleoptera
Trogositidae
Undetermined
Coleoptera
Cleridae
Undetermined
Coleoptera
Melyridae
Undetermined
Coleoptera
Cucujicae
Undetermined
Coleoptera
Cucujicae
Undetermined
Order
Family
Subfamily
Genus
Subgenus
Species
Subspecies
Coleoptera
Nitidulidae
Carpophilus
pallipennis
Coleoptera
Nitidulidae
Carpophilus
pallipennis
Coleoptera
Colydiidae
Undetermined
Coleoptera
Mycetophagidae
Typhaea
stercorea
Coleoptera
Mycetophagidae
Typhaea
stercorea
Coleoptera
Coccinelidae
Undetermined
Coleoptera
Coccinelidae
Hippodamia
convergens
Coleoptera
Coccinelidae
Hippodamia
convergens
Coleoptera
Coccinelidae
Hippodamia
convergens
Coleoptera
Coccinelidae
Hippodamia
convergens
Coleoptera
Coccinelidae
Hippodamia
convergens
Coleoptera
Mordelidae
Undetermined
Coleoptera
Tenebrionidae
Undetermined
Coleoptera
Tenebrionidae
Anepsius
delicatulus
Coleoptera
Tenebrionidae
Anepsius
delicatulus
Coleoptera
Tenebrionidae
Anepsius
delicatulus
Coleoptera
Tenebrionidae
Anepsius
delicatulus
Order
Family
Subfamily
Genus
Subgenus
Species
Subspecies
Coleoptera
Tenebrionidae
Argoporis
bicolor
Coleoptera
Tenebrionidae
Argoporis
bicolor
Coleoptera
Tenebrionidae
Asbolus
(Cryptoglossus)
verrucosus
Coleoptera
Tenebrionidae
Asbolus
(Cryptoglossus)
verrucosus
Coleoptera
Tenebrionidae
Asbolus
(Cryptoglossus)
verrucosus
Coleoptera
Tenebrionidae
Asbolus
(Cryptoglossus)
verrucosus
Coleoptera
Tenebrionidae
Blapstinus
pubescens
Coleoptera
Tenebrionidae
Blapstinus
pubescens
Coleoptera
Tenebrionidae
Blapstinus
vandykei
Coleoptera
Tenebrionidae
Cerenopus
concolor
Coleoptera
Tenebrionidae
Cerenopus
concolor
Coleoptera
Tenebrionidae
Cerenopus
concolor
Coleoptera
Tenebrionidae
Cerenopus
concolor
Coleoptera
Tenebrionidae
Cerenopus
concolor
Coleoptera
Tenebrionidae
Craniontis
pubescens
Coleoptera
Tenebrionidae
Cryptoglossus
muricatus
Coleoptera
Tenebrionidae
Cryptoglossus
muricatus
 
 
Order
Family
Subfamily
Genus
Subgenus
Species
Subspecies
Coleoptera
Tenebrionidae
Cryptoglossus
muricatus
Coleoptera
Tenebrionidae
Cyaneus
angustata
Coleoptera
Tenebrionidae
Edrotes
ventricosus
Coleoptera
Tenebrionidae
Edrotes
ventricosus
Coleoptera
Tenebrionidae
Edrotes
ventricosus
Coleoptera
Tenebrionidae
Edrotes
ventricosus
Coleoptera
Tenebrionidae
Edrotes
ventricosus
Coleoptera
Tenebrionidae
Eleodes
armatus
Coleoptera
Tenebrionidae
Eleodes
armatus
Coleoptera
Tenebrionidae
Eleodes
armatus
Coleoptera
Tenebrionidae
Eleodes
armatus
Coleoptera
Tenebrionidae
Eleodes
armatus
Coleoptera
Tenebrionidae
Eleodes
armatus
Coleoptera
Tenebrionidae
Eleodes
armatus
Coleoptera
Tenebrionidae
Eupsopholus
castaneum
Coleoptera
Tenebrionidae
Eupsopholus
castaneum
Coleoptera
Tenebrionidae
Eupsopholus
castaneum
Order
Family
Subfamily
Genus
Subgenus
Species
Subspecies
Coleoptera
Tenebrionidae
Eupsopholus
castaneum
Coleoptera
Tenebrionidae
Eupsopholus
castaneum
Coleoptera
Tenebrionidae
Eusattus
difficilis
Coleoptera
Tenebrionidae
Eusattus
dubius
Coleoptera
Tenebrionidae
Eusattus
dubius
Coleoptera
Tenebrionidae
Eusattus
dubius
Coleoptera
Tenebrionidae
Eusattus
muricatus
Coleoptera
Tenebrionidae
Eusattus
muricatus
Coleoptera
Tenebrionidae
Eusattus
muricatus
Coleoptera
Tenebrionidae
Larviversius
tibialis
Coleoptera
Tenebrionidae
Mecysmus
angustatus
Coleoptera
Tenebrionidae
Mecysmus
angustatus
Coleoptera
Tenebrionidae
Metoponium
spp
Coleoptera
Tenebrionidae
Metoponium
spp
Coleoptera
Tenebrionidae
Metoponium
spp
Coleoptera
Tenebrionidae
Metoponium
spp
Coleoptera
Tenebrionidae
Metoponium
spp
Order
Family
Subfamily
Genus
Subgenus
Species
Subspecies
Coleoptera
Tenebrionidae
Nocibiotes
granulatus
Coleoptera
Tenebrionidae
Notibius
puberculus
Coleoptera
Tenebrionidae
Notibius
puberculus
Coleoptera
Tenebrionidae
Notibius
puberculus
Coleoptera
Tenebrionidae
Notibius
puberculus
Coleoptera
Tenebrionidae
Telabis
spp
Coleoptera
Tenebrionidae
Telabis
spp
Coleoptera
Tenebrionidae
Triorophus
laevis
Coleoptera
Tenebrionidae
Triorophus
laevis
Coleoptera
Tenebrionidae
Triorophus
laevis
Coleoptera
Tenebrionidae
Triorophus
laevis
Coleoptera
Tenebrionidae
Triorophus
laevis
Coleoptera
Tenebrionidae
Triorophus
laevis
Coleoptera
Tenebrionidae
Triorophus
politus
Coleoptera
Tenebrionidae
Trogloderus
castatus
vandykei
Coleoptera
Tenebrionidae
Trogloderus
castatus
vandykei
Coleoptera
Alleculidae
Undetermined
 
 
Order
Family
Subfamily
Genus
Subgenus
Species
Subspecies
Coleoptera
Alleculidae
Hymenorus
irritus
Coleoptera
Oedomeridae
Undetermined
Coleoptera
Oedomeridae
Asclera
sp
Coleoptera
Oedomeridae
Oxacis
sp
Coleoptera
Oedomeridae
Oxacis
sp
Coleoptera
Oedomeridae
Rhinoplatia
ruficollis
Coleoptera
Meloidae
Cysteodermus
armatus
Coleoptera
Meloidae
Cysteodermus
armatus
Coleoptera
Meloidae
Cysteodermus
armatus
Coleoptera
Meloidae
Cysteodermus
armatus
Coleoptera
Meloidae
Cysteodermus
armatus
Coleoptera
Meloidae
Cysteodermus
armatus
Coleoptera
Meloidae
Cysteodermus
armatus
Coleoptera
Meloidae
Epicauta
lauta
Coleoptera
Meloidae
Epicauta
lauta
Coleoptera
Meloidae
Epicauta
tenella
Coleoptera
Meloidae
Cysteodermus
armatus
Order
Family
Subfamily
Genus
Subgenus
Species
Subspecies
Coleoptera
Meloidae
Eupompha
elegans
perpulchra
Coleoptera
Meloidae
Eupompha
elegans
perpulchra
Coleoptera
Meloidae
Eupompha
elegans
perpulchra
Coleoptera
Meloidae
Eupompha
elegans
perpulchra
Coleoptera
Meloidae
Lytta
auriculata
Coleoptera
Meloidae
Lytta
auriculata
Coleoptera
Meloidae
Lytta
magister
Coleoptera
Meloidae
Lytta
magister
Coleoptera
Meloidae
Lytta
magister
Coleoptera
Meloidae
Lytta
stygica
Coleoptera
Meloidae
Phodaga
alticeps
Coleoptera
Anthicidae
Undetermined
Coleoptera
Anthicidae
Mecynotarsus
delicatatulus
Coleoptera
Anthicidae
Tanarthrus
tartarus
Coleoptera
Anthicidae
Thicanus
annectens
Coleoptera
Anthicidae
Thicanus
annectens
Coleoptera
Anthicidae
Vacusus
confinis
Order
Family
Subfamily
Genus
Subgenus
Species
Subspecies
Coleoptera
Anthicidae
Vacusus
confinis
Coleoptera
Anthicidae
Vacusus
confinis
Coleoptera
Cerambycidae
Crossidius
discoideus
blandi
Coleoptera
Cerambycidae
Derobrachus
leechi
Coleoptera
Cerambycidae
Derobrachus
leechi
Coleoptera
Cerambycidae
Moneilema
semipunctatum
Coleoptera
Cerambycidae
Neoclytus
tenuiscriptus
Coleoptera
Cerambycidae
Plionema
rubens
Coleoptera
Chrysomelidae
Undetermined
Coleoptera
Chrysomelidae
Altica
torquata
Coleoptera
Chrysomelidae
Altica
torquata
Coleoptera
Chrysomelidae
Altica
torquata
Coleoptera
Chrysomelidae
Glyptina
atriventris
Coleoptera
Chrysomelidae
Lema
trilineata
daturaphila
Coleoptera
Chrysomelidae
Metachroa
immaculata
Coleoptera
Chrysomelidae
Pachybrachus
mellitus
Coleoptera
Chrysomelidae
Phyllotreta
sp.
 
 
Order
Family
Subfamily
Genus
Subgenus
Species
Subspecies
Coleoptera
Chrysomelidae
Phyllotreta
sp.
Coleoptera
Curculionidae
Undetermined
Coleoptera
Curculionidae
Anthonemus
Cnemocyllus
inermis
Coleoptera
Curculionidae
Cleonus
jacobinus
Coleoptera
Curculionidae
Cleonus
saginatus
Coleoptera
Curculionidae
Apleurus
albovestitus
Coleoptera
Curculionidae
Apleurus
angularis
Coleoptera
Curculionidae
Apleurus
angularis
Coleoptera
Curculionidae
Ophryastes
argentatus
Coleoptera
Curculionidae
Ophryastes
argentatus
Coleoptera
Curculionidae
Ophryastes
argentatus
Coleoptera
Curculionidae
Ophryastes
desertus
Coleoptera
Curculionidae
Ophryastes
desertus
Coleoptera
Curculionidae
Ophryastes
desertus
Coleoptera
Curculionidae
Ophryastes
geminatus
Coleoptera
Curculionidae
Ophryastes
geminatus
Coleoptera
Curculionidae
Ophryastes
geminatus
Order
Family
Subfamily
Genus
Subgenus
Species
Subspecies
Coleoptera
Curculionidae
Ophryastes
geminitus
Coleoptera
Curculionidae
Ophryastes
varius
Coleoptera
Curculionidae
Ophryastes
varius
Coleoptera
Curculionidae
Ophryastes
varius
Coleoptera
Curculionidae
Ophryastes
varius
Coleoptera
Curculionidae
Scyphophorus
yuccae
Coleoptera
Curculionidae
Sphenophorus
graminis
Coleoptera
Curculionidae
Sphenophorus
graminis
Coleoptera
Curculionidae
Sphenophorus
graminis
Coleoptera
Curculionidae
Sphenophorus
graminis
Coleoptera
Curculionidae
Trigonoscuta
Eremacatoecus
sp.
Coleoptera
Bruchidae
Undetermined
Coleoptera
Bruchidae
Algarobius
prosopis
Coleoptera
Bruchidae
Algarobius
prosopis
Coleoptera
Bruchidae
Algarobius
prosopis
Coleoptera
Bruchidae
Algarobius
prosopis
Coleoptera
Bruchidae
Algarobius
prosopis
Order
Family
Subfamily
Genus
Subgenus
Species
Subspecies
Coleoptera
Bruchidae
Merobruchus
julianus
Coleoptera
Bruchidae
Stator
limbatus
Lepidoptera
Undetermined
Lepidoptera
Noctuidae
Melipotis
hadeniformis
Lepidoptera
Geometridae
Undetermined
Lepidoptera
Geometridae
Semiothisa
sp.
Lepidoptera
Noctuidae
Undetermined
Lepidoptera
Noctuidae
Bulia
deducta
Lepidoptera
Noctuidae
Bulia
deducta
Lepidoptera
Noctuidae
Bulia
deducta
Lepidoptera
Noctuidae
Forsebia
periaeta
Lepidoptera
Noctuidae
Melipotis
hadeniformis
Lepidoptera
Noctuidae
Melipotis
hadeniformis
Lepidoptera
Sphingidae
Undetermined
Lepidoptera
Sphingidae
Agrius
cingulata
Lepidoptera
Hesperidae
Erynnis
funeralis
Lepidoptera
Hesperidae
Pholisora
libya
 
 
Order
Family
Subfamily
Genus
Subgenus
Species
Subspecies
Lepidoptera
Hesperidae
Pyrgus
albescens
Lepidoptera
Lycaenidae
Brephidium
exilis
Lepidoptera
Lycaenidae
Brephidium
exilis
Lepidoptera
Lycaenidae
Brephidium
exilis
Lepidoptera
Lycaenidae
Brephidium
exilis
Lepidoptera
Lycaenidae
Hemiargus
ceraunus
Lepidoptera
Lycaenidae
Hemiargus
ceraunus
Lepidoptera
Lycaenidae
Icaricia
lupini
lupini
Lepidoptera
Lycaenidae
Strymon
melinus
Lepidoptera
Riodinidae
Apodemia
mormo
Lepidoptera
Pieridae
Anthocaris
pima
Lepidoptera
Pieridae
Colias
alexandra
Lepidoptera
Pieridae
Colias
eurythema
Lepidoptera
Pieridae
Eudoc
hyantis
Lepidoptera
Pieridae
Pontia
protodice
Lepidoptera
Pieridae
Pontia
protodice
Lepidoptera
Pieridae
Pontia
protodice
Order
Family
Subfamily
Genus
Subgenus
Species
Subspecies
Lepidoptera
Danaidae
Danaus
plesippus
Lepidoptera
Danaidae
Danaus
gilippus
strigosus
Lepidoptera
Danaidae
Danaus
gilippus
strigosus
Lepidoptera
Nymphalidae
Chlosyne
neumoegeni
Lepidoptera
Nymphalidae
Chlosyne
neumoegeni
Lepidoptera
Nymphalidae
Vanessa
cardui
Diptera
Undetermined
Diptera
Culicidae
Undetermined
Diptera
Stratiomyiidae
Undetermined
Diptera
Tabanidae
Undetermined
Diptera
Asilidae
Undetermined
Diptera
Bombyliidae
Undetermined
Diptera
Empididae
Undetermined
Diptera
Dolichopodidae
Undetermined
Diptera
Phoridae
Undetermined
Diptera
Syrphidae
Undetermined
Diptera
Otitidae
Undetermined
Order
Family
Subfamily
Genus
Subgenus
Species
Subspecies
Diptera
Tephritidae
Undetermined
Diptera
Ephydridae
Undetermined
Diptera
Heleomyzidae
Undetermined
Diptera
Anthomyiidae
Undetermined
Diptera
Muscidae
Undetermined
Diptera
Callophoridae
Undetermined
Diptera
Apioceridae
Undetermined
Diptera
Culicidae
Undetermined
Diptera
Drosophila
Undetermined
Diptera
Rhinotoridae
Undetermined
Diptera
Sarcophagidae
Undetermined
Diptera
Tachinidae
Undetermined
Hymenoptera
Braconidae
Undetermined
Hymenoptera
Ichneumonidae
Undetermined
Hymenoptera
Chalcididae
Undetermined
Hymenoptera
Anthophoridae
Undetermined
Hymenoptera
Chrysididae
Undetermined
 
 
Order
Family
Subfamily
Genus
Subgenus
Species
Subspecies
Hymenoptera
Tiphiidae
Undetermined
Hymenoptera
Mutillidae
Undetermined
Hymenoptera
Mutillidae
Dasymutilis
sp
Hymenoptera
Formicidae
Undetermined
Hymenoptera
Formicidae
Conomyrma
bicolor
Hymenoptera
Formicidae
Conomyrma
insana
Hymenoptera
Formicidae
Forelius
pruinosus
Hymenoptera
Formicidae
Forelius
pruinosus
Hymenoptera
Formicidae
Forelius
pruinosus
Hymenoptera
Formicidae
Forelius
pruinosus
Hymenoptera
Formicidae
Messor
pergandei
Hymenoptera
Formicidae
Messor
pergandei
Hymenoptera
Formicidae
Messor
pergandei
Hymenoptera
Formicidae
Messor
pergandei
Hymenoptera
Formicidae
Messor
pergandei
Hymenoptera
Formicidae
Messor
pergandei
Hymenoptera
Formicidae
Myrmecocystus
semirufus
Order
Family
Subfamily
Genus
Subgenus
Species
Subspecies
Hymenoptera
Formicidae
Myrmecocystus
semirufus
Hymenoptera
Formicidae
Myrmecocystus
semirufus
Hymenoptera
Formicidae
Myrmecocystus
semirufus
Hymenoptera
Formicidae
Myrmecocystus
semirufus
Hymenoptera
Formicidae
Pheidole
grallipes
Hymenoptera
Formicidae
Pheidole
grallipes
Hymenoptera
Formicidae
Pheidole
grallipes
Hymenoptera
Formicidae
Pogonomyrmex
californicus
Hymenoptera
Formicidae
Pogonomyrmex
californicus
Hymenoptera
Formicidae
Pogonomyrmex
californicus
Hymenoptera
Formicidae
Pogonomyrmex
californicus
Hymenoptera
Formicidae
Pogonomyrmex
magnacanthus
Hymenoptera
Formicidae
Solenopsis
aurea
Hymenoptera
Formicidae
Solenopsis
maniosa
Hymenoptera
Formicidae
Solenopsis
molesta
Hymenoptera
Formicidae
Solenopsis
xyloni
Hymenoptera
Formicidae
Solenopsis
xyloni
Order
Family
Subfamily
Genus
Subgenus
Species
Subspecies
Hymenoptera
Formicidae
Solenopsis
xyloni
Hymenoptera
Formicidae
Solenopsis
xyloni
Hymenoptera
Formicidae
Solenopsis
xyloni
Hymenoptera
Formicidae
Solenopsis
xyloni
Hymenoptera
Vespidae
? ? ? ?

How to Get to the Desert Studies Center

 

The Desert Studies Center is located at Soda Springs (a.k.a. “Zzyzx”), on the western shore of Soda Dry Lake, and in the northwest corner of the Mojave National Preserve.  We are accessed via Interstate 15, the main highway between the Los Angeles area of Southern California, and Las Vegas, Nevada.  From the west, take I-15 North towards Barstow and Las Vegas.  About 58 miles past Barstow, take the Zzyzx Road exit, and turn right.  From the Las Vegas area, take I-15 South towards Baker/Barstow/Los Angeles, and take the Zzyzx Road exit (about 6 miles past Baker, California) and turn left.

Once on Zzyzx Road, continue south to the DSC - at road’s end - about 4.3 miles.  The road is paved along most of the route (wildlife water along the short dirt section – please drive SLOWLY).  Guests with reservations may pass through the entry gate, turn left and follow signs to the parking area.  NOTE:  visiting members of the public must park in the National Park Service parking area, on the right just before passing through our gate.  Visitors are free to explore the area on foot during daylight hours. Dogs must be on leads while visiting, and are not allowed in the buildings.

The Area

The Center is situated on the shore of Soda Dry Lake at an elevation of 237 meters (938 feet) and at the western edge of the Mojave National Preserve. As such it serves as a convenient departure point for groups visiting the Death Valley National Park, the Kelso Dunes, the Afton Canyon riparian areas, the Cima Dome and Volcanic area, the historic Mojave Road, the Early Man Site at Calico, the Providence, New York, Granite, and Clark mountains, and many other interesting features and localities in the East Mojave Desert.

 

Facilities

Housing

The Center can accommodate up to 75 individuals in dormitory style rooms each holding two to twelve persons.  A small number of private/faculty rooms are also available. For those intending to utilize the facility for an extended period of time, two long-term researcher residences are available. Each is equipped with its own full kitchen and bathroom with enough space to accommodate up to five individuals. All rooms are equipped with single, double or bunk beds with mattresses; guests must supply their own bedding or sleeping bag and pillow.  All dorm rooms have heaters, and are cooled by evaporative coolers in the warmer months.  The community bathhouse provides sinks, hot showers and flush toilets.  There are no camping facilities at the Center, however, camping is permitted in the Razor Open Area approximately four miles south of the facility, accessible from the Razor Road exit off I-15. RVs can be accommodated with approved advanced notice, however, there are no utility hookups or dump station at the DSC.

Food Service

The following options are available for food service while staying at the DSC:

  • Arrange for catering, either through the DSC (groups of 10 or more) or independently (see below)
  • Utilize the kitchen facilities at the DSC for self-service of group meals (see below)
  • Dine at one of the several restaurants in Baker (20 minutes from the DSC)
Catering - Those wishing to arrange catering through the DSC should request this option during the reservation process.  Prices for this service will vary depending on the number of meals and menu requested.

Self-service - Groups choosing to provide their own food service using the DSC kitchen facilities or their own equipment must comply with certain federal regulations as required by the National Park Service and the County of San Bernardino. Contact the Administrative Coordinator for a permit forms and instructions. The DSC will pay your permit fee and the process can be completed by Fax.  Individuals who are not part of a group may prepare their own meals at the DSC without permit, but access to kitchen facilities may be limited.  There are both outdoor and indoor dining areas at the DSC along with access to gas barbecues on our patio.  

Dine Out - A list of restaurant facilities in is available on request from the administrative office.

Instructional & Research Facilities

In addition to living accommodations, DSC guests have access to both classroom and laboratory space.  Two meeting rooms are available, each able to accommodate about 30 people, as well as the Main Hall, which although usually configured as the dining room, can be reconfigured for meetings of up to 60 people.  Chalkboards, dry-erase boards, flip charts, VCR/DVD players and monitors, 35mm and overhead projectors, LCD projectors, windows and Mac laptops, wireless presentation controls/laser pointer, and screens are all available for guest use.  A moderately equipped laboratory is available for individual or group use (lab equipment/supplies and field equipment lists available on request), as are our herbarium, invertebrate and vertebrate collections.  A modest library is also available, focusing on reference materials, maps, research reports and theses pertaining to the region. The center has wifi internet access, available at the discretion of the manager.   Qualified individuals may have access to our telescopes for astronomical observations. The DSC Managers are familiar with much of the region, as well as the needs of instructors and researchers working in it, and are available for consultation before or during your visit. 

Utilities at the Desert Studies Center

The DSC is located in a remote area not served by utility companies.  As such, we provide our own utility systems.  Water at the DSC is produced from a well and naturally contains several mineral salts, rendering it non-potable (not drinkable), but suitable for all other purposes such as showering and dishwashing.  We purify our own drinking water on-site by reverse osmosis, and this water is provided to guests at specific locations.  Electrical power is supplied primarily by a photovoltaic (solar) power station, supplemented by wind generators and propane/diesel generators.  Power is supplied to guests at a standard 110 VAC @ 60Hz, but must be conserved to stay within generating capacities.  Outside lighting is usually terminated by 10 P.M. and guests are encouraged to conserve power when possible and avoid the use of high demand items such as hairdryers.

Additional Facilities

Those staying for longer periods may use our laundry facility (automatic washer, and clothesline drying).   During free time you may relax around the campfire ring, toss horseshoes, use the basketball hoop, or soak in our small pool (season permitting!).  A small gift store is also available, with DSC T-shirts, hats, and cups, as well as postcards, notecards, and books about the region.

Accessibility

Most facilities at the Center are wheelchair accessible.
 

Education and Research

 

Research and Educational Opportunities

The facilities of the Desert Studies Center, and the surrounding diverse habitats, geology, landscape features, and history, provide abundant opportunities to conduct research or engage in field instruction.  We often hear from field scientists, instructors and graduate students alike, that field experiences during their pre-graduate education were instrumental in choosing their post-graduate or career paths.  And from students, we hear how instructive a field experience can be in supplementing their class-work, and how it often helps them understand, in a more comprehensive way, the subjects they are studying.  The Desert Studies Center’s core mission is to support these important activities that enrich our understanding of the Mojave Desert and other arid lands.

Natural and Cultural Resources

The eastern Mojave Desert is a region of complex topography and geology, lying in the southern Great Basin geophysical province.  This results in a rich flora and fauna, distributed among several life zones and communities, in a landscape of rugged mountains, alluvial fans and bajadas, sand dunes, volcanic fields, pediment domes, drainage systems and playas.  Although the Mojave is North America’s smallest desert, it is it’s most diverse, owing to it’s shared species alliances with the Colorado/Sonoran deserts to the south and east, and the Great Basin Desert to the north.

Researchers and educators in the Earth Sciences will find opportunities to study and provide field instruction in structural geology, petrology, paleontology, mineralogy, volcanism, geomorphology, pedology and climatology.  Those working in the Life Sciences can find opportunities to study organismal ecology and physiology, community structure, ecological relationships and processes across multiple scales, and conservation biology.  Archaeologists, Anthropologists, and Historians will find diverse cultural resources, from pre-historic lithic artifacts and quarries, petroglyphs, Native American habitation sites and footpaths, to the remnants of mule trails, wagon roads, military posts, and sites reflecting the areas mining and ranching past.  Image galleries of some these resources may be viewed here, and the Managers are familiar with the area to help with any questions you may have about details, such as accessibility or regulatory issues.

Educational Support

Most of our guests are engaged in educational activities, with students applying their formal classroom studies to a real world “outdoor classroom”.  From architecture to zoology, classes come from many institutions, and from as far away as Hong Kong and Great Britain to engage in hands-on study.  While at the DSC, educational groups have access to our teaching facilities (classroom and laboratory), and their related equipment.  Both have space for about 30 individuals, and can be equipped with video projectors (35mm also available), screens, audio equipment and video players, flat screen monitors, white boards and flip charts.  A copier/scanner is available, and the facility has WiFi throughout.  A reference library is open to guests, with reference volumes, research publications, theses, reports, field guides, and an assortment of maps and satellite images.

Conducting Research

Research at the DSC ranges widely, from NASA scientists studying landscape features and microorganisms directed towards Martian exploration, to undergraduates conducting their first field research on ant foraging.  Although most research is conducted by graduate students or faculty in academia, many projects are conducted by government agency scientists, and those from various other institutions and organizations.  A laboratory is available if desired (see below).  Those intending on conducting research while at he DSC must read our research guidelines, and submit an Application for Research  for approval, before work begins.

Laboratory

The Laboratory has large working tables and counter tops, sinks, several light tables, two large architectural-type inclining tables, a fume hood, and flammables and refrigerated storage.  Balances include analytical, top loading and triple beam.  A gravity oven, incubator, spectrophotometer, and an assortment lab supplies, glassware and related equipment (including Buchner filtration) are available. Optical equipment include a 100-2,000X microscope with phase contrast and oil immersion, three petro-graphic microscopes, 12 binocular “dissection” scopes (with light sources), various hand lenses, a 12-48X field scope and tripod, and 10”, 11” and 18” reflecting astronomical telescopes.  Water sampling and analysis equipment, a hydraulic rock breaker, and soil sieves with a stack shaker are also available.  If you intend on using the Laboratory or its equipment for other than classroom space, you must contact the Managers to discuss activities planned and availability of equipment, during your planning phase.

Field Assets at the DSC

A variety of field gear, such as insect lights, traps and nets, small mammal live-traps (Hava-Hart and Sherman), ultraviolet “scorpion” flashlights, measurement  tapes and a rolling distance recorder are available.  Two wildlife cameras can be used, by prior arrangement, to capture time-based or motion activated images.

Within walking distance of the Center’s buildings are habitats ranging from saline playa, to alluvial fans and drainages, to rocky slopes, with subsequent vegetation changes associated with soil and moisture conditions (from salt marshes along the shore of Soda Lake to Creosote Bush Scrub on the adjoining ridges and slopes, with a halophytic plant zone in-between).  There are shoreline features of Pleistocene Lake Mojave, including beach deposits and wave-cut features, along which can be found archaeological sites such as petroglyphs, lithic quarries, and mesquite bean processing sites.  Historical features nearby include rock inscriptions from 1859, remnants of the old wagon road, Tidewater & Tonopah railroad, and salt mining operations of the early 1900’s.   Rocks present locally are Triassic metavolcanic rocks and Miocene granites, with a few outcrops of Permian limestone (including Limestone Hill, around which the Center’s buildings are clustered, and which features fossil stromatolite deposits and a Calcicolous Scrub plant community).

Aquatic habitats at the Center include West Pond, Lake Tuendae and MC Spring (the latter two with endangered Mojave Tui Chub minnows).  Clusters of mesquite trees occur in various places, and together with the horticultural plantings of Tamarisk trees, fan and date palms provide good habitat for over 250 species of birds throughout the year.  A short walk/drive south of the field-station is a pit-fall trap-line grid, with five rows of 26 5-gallon bucket traps ascending an alluvial fan.   This grid begins in halophytic vegetation adjacent to the playa, and upwards onto a sandy psammophytic plant community at the base of the alluvial fan, with soils getting coarser and drainages more incised up-slope.  The grid area provides a good place for studying soil/plant relationships, and, for those properly permitted, use of the pit-fall traps to sample reptiles and invertebrates, as well rodent live-traps for sampling Kangaroo Rats, pocket and deer mice, and maybe a woodrat or rare gopher.  All intended educational field activities in and around the DSC must be discussed with the Managers during your planning phase, to assure compliance with applicable regulations and policies, and the appropriateness of such activities in and around the DSC.

Judith Presch Desert Research Scholarship

Open to: Undergraduate (one award) Graduate (one award) students pursuing research in the Mojave Desert. Named in memory of Judith A. Presch, Human Resource Specialist, California State University, Fullerton and Desert Studies Center Supporter. Awarded annually to one undergraduate and one graduate student working through the Desert Studies Center, Zzyzx, California. Successful applicants may also have all fees waived for use of the Desert Studies Center facilities for one year. Applications will be reviewed and evaluated by the Research Award Committee of the California Desert Studies Consortium. Awards will be announced in November. For additional information and application contact the Desert Studies Office at California State University, Fullerton.

 

Welcome . . .

The Desert Studies Center (DSC) is a field station of the California State University, located within the Mojave National Preserve, at the oasis of Soda Springs (aka: Zzyzx).   The DSC is centrally located within a region of diverse geological, biological, and cultural resources, and provides support facilities for those engaged in research or academic field studies in a rich variety of disciplines.

Zzyzx Dust Cam

Desert Studies Center

About the Desert Studies Center

The Desert Studies Center provides the opportunity for individuals and groups to conduct research, receive instruction, and experience the desert environment. Established in 1976 under a cooperative agreement with the Bureau of Land Management, the Center is operated for the CSU by the California Desert Studies Consortium, an organization of seven southern California CSU campuses: Dominguez Hills, Fullerton, Long Beach, Los Angeles, Northridge, Pomona and San Bernardino. With the passage of the California Desert Protection Act of 1994, the Desert Studies Center was placed into the Mojave National Preserve, and the National Park Service became our federal partner with the signing of a new cooperative agreement.

The DSC facilities provide housing for up to 75 individuals in dormitory rooms, and two Research Residences (self-contained with kitchen and bath) are available for up to 5 individuals each. Meal service is available, as well as classroom, laboratory and library facilities.

Desert Studies Center