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Desert Studies Center

Public Courses at the DSC

The Desert Studies Center hosts several weekend-long in-residence courses on various topics related to the Mojave Desert. Registration for these courses is through the University of California, Riverside Extension, and are available for credit. Registration may be done on line on line, or by calling 951-827-5801. Course fees include two nights’ lodging at the Center, a snack Friday evening, and five meals beginning with breakfast Saturday. Take a look at recent and upcoming courses in this series:

Annual Desert Symposium

 30th Annual
2016 Desert Symposium
April 15 and 16, 2016
Symposium Field Trip April 17 and 18, 2016


California State University, Fullerton Desert Studies, Zzyzx

Theme: Evolution of the Lower Colorado River System

Share your research with a presentation or a poster.
Contributed papers-15 minutes.


Friday, April 15 and Saturday, April 16, 2016

Submission deadline for abstracts, poster abstracts and abstracts of papers: January 13, 2016

Completed Paper deadline February 12, 2016

Field Trip: April 17,18, 2016

General trip route:  Head NE out of Baker on I-15 to the Nipton Road, cross Ivanpah Valley, the New York Mts, and drive to Searchlight. From there, turn south past Piute Valley on 95 to Needles. Cross the Chemehuevi Mts to Chemehuevi Valley. In the vicinity of Parker, we may make stops both in CA and AZ, Then, perhaps heading south on AZ 95 past Blythe to Cibol. The trip may end near the Trigo Mts, with retreat along I-10.

Click here to download SYMPOSIUM Information

Click here to download 2016 Desert Symposium Registration Form

Click here to download 2016 Sympoium Schedule

2016 Desert Symposium Schedule

Desert Studies Center, Zzyzx—April 15 - 18, 2016

Friday, April 15

 
7:00-8:15

Breakfast

 
8:45

William Presch

Welcome and Announcements – ANNIVERSARIES

 
8:55

George T. Jefferson and Fred Budinger, Jr.

A short history of the Desert Symposium: LMFTAACE, MDQRC, MDQRS, DRS,   DS

 
9:00

Lara Kobelt

Xeroriparian community patterns at the Sonoran and Mojave Desert   ecotone

 
9:20

Kristin H. Berry, Timothy A. Gowan, D. M. Miller, and M. L. Brooks

The importance of surficial geology in invasion and establishment of   Sahara mustard

 
9:40

David K. Lynch

Living on the edge: enhanced roadside growth of creosote bush (Larrea   tridentata)

 
10:00

BREAK

 
10:20

James W. Cornett

Long-term population dynamics of the Joshua tree (Yucca brevifolia)   at Saddleback Butte State Park, Los Angeles County, California

 
10: 40

Jeffrey E. Lovich, Mickey Agha, D. Delaney, and J. R. Ennen

Recent findings from 20 years of research on Agassiz’s desert   tortoises at an operating wind energy facility

 
11:00

Jeremy S. Mack, Kristin H. Berry, D. M. Miller and A. S. Carlson

Factors affecting the thermal environment of Agassiz’s desert tortoise   (Gopherus agassizii) cover sites in the central Mojave Desert during   periods of temperature extremes2

 
11:20

Shellie R. Puffer, Amanda L. Smith, Jeffrey E. Lovich, L. A. Tennant,   T. R. Arundel, Michael S. Vamstad, and K. D. Brundige.

Predation of Agassiz’s desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) in   Joshua Tree National Park: a whodunit with the American badger (Taxidea   taxus) as the prime suspect

 
11:40

LUNCH

Set up posters for social at 5:30

 
12:00–12:45

Richard A. VanCuren and others

Armchair investigation of Bouse parameters: A discussion of the   Plio-Pleistocene environment with emphasis on southwestern North America and   the Lower Colorado River

 
1:00

Edward L. LaRue, Jr. and Sharon Dougherty

Monitoring lessons at the Lynx Cat Mountain Mine, San Bernardino   County, California

 
1:20

Ed LaRue

History, distribution and conservation of the Mohave ground squirrel (Xerospermophilus   mohavensis)

 
1:40

Tanya Henderson

It takes a village to raise a vole

 
2:00

Patrick Donnelly

Desert renewable energy détente: the DRECP and the Amargosa Basin

 
2:20

BREAK



 
2:40

David Buesch and Geoffrey Phelps



Architecture, geochemistry, and paleomagnetic directions of the 5.42 Ma   Broadwell Mesa basalt volcanic field, Bristol Mountains, California

 
3:00

Edith C. Rojas** Salazar and Jennifer M. Garrison

Constraints on the source of an Early Miocene ignimbrite in the   western Mojave Desert: preliminary zircon ages

 
3:20

Stephen M. Rowland and Gordon Haight



An ichnotaxonomically diverse fossil tracksite with multiple Grallator   trackways in the Aztec Sandstone (Jurassic) of Red Rock Canyon National   Conservation Area, Las Vegas, Nevada

   
3:40

BREAK

   
4:00

N. Scott Rugh

Miocene invertebrate fossils demonstrate the faunal diversity of the   Topanga Formation in Orange County

   
4:20

Douglas B. Sims and W. Geoffrey Spaulding

Evidence for post-glacial lakes in the Ivanpah Basin

 
4:40

David K. Lynch and Paul M. Adams

Ground-based thermal infrared imaging survey of the Salton Buttes

 
5:00

David K. Lynch, David S. P. Dearborn, and S. C. Richtsmeier

Structure and optics of the antisolar twilight

 
5:20

SOCIAL and POSTERS

ARRANGE CARPOOLS

 


Shayna Avila**

Repeat photography and secondary succession: Ballarat, CA

 


William F. Abersek**, Maya L. Fassler, and Don Lofgren

Nonmarine gastropods from the Lake Bed locality, upper member, Barstow   Formation, California

 


Ramona Daniels and J. C. Carse

The Whipple Mountains saguaros

 


Justine Perez**, Teresa Cabrera Vera and A. Mistretta

Surface geomorphology and vegetation analyses on three alluvial fans   at Zzyzx, CA

 


Brennan O’Connell**, Rebecca J. Dorsey, M. Homan, B. F. Gootee, and K.   House

Structural controls on stratigraphic architecture of the southern   Bouse Formation near Cibola, Arizona

 


L. Sue Beard, Gordon B. Haxel, Rebecca J. Dorsey, Kristin A. McDougall, and Carl E. Jacobson

Late Neogene deformation of the Chocolate Mountains Anticlinorium:   implications for deposition of the Bouse Formation and early evolution of the   Lower Colorado River

 


Andrew J. Cyr

New surficial geologic mapping reveals change from Pleistocene dextral strike-slip to Holocene transpression along the Soda–Avawatz fault zone, eastern Mojave Desert

 


William F. Abersek**, Maya L. Fassler, and Don Lofgren

Nonmarine gastropods from the Lake Bed locality, upper member, Barstow   Formation, California

 


Douglas B. Sims and W. Geoffrey Spaulding

Evidence for post-glacial lakes in the Ivanpah Basin

 


Mark Roeder and G. A. Smith

New records of fossil freshwater bony   fish from the lower Colorado River Valley of southeastern California and   western Arizona.

 
6:20

BANQUET

 
7:30

Dr. Rebecca M. E. Williams

Roving the Red Planet: A field geologist explores Gale Crater

 
Saturday,   April 16

 
7:00-8:15

Breakfast

 
9:00

P. Kyle House



The LOCO Strata: new observations, mapping, discoveries, and ideas   about key geologic deposits chronicling the inception and evolution of the   lower Colorado River from the Pliocene to the present

 
9:20

Scott E. K. Bennett, M. H. Darin, R. J. Dorsey, L. A. Skinner, P. J.   Umhoefer, and M. E. Oskin

Animated tectonic reconstruction of the Lower Colorado River region:   implications for Late Miocene to Present deformation

 
9:40

Ryan Crow, Karl Karlstrom, K. Howard, S. Beard, P. K. House, W. Sharp,   V. Polyak, L. Peters, Y. Asmerom, W. McIntosh, D. Block, and L. Crossey

Integratinglower Colorado   River alluvial deposits and Grand Canyon incision constraints to reconstruct   paleo Colorado River profiles and determine Colorado Plateau uplift

 
10:00

K. E. Karlstrom,L. C. Crossey, R. Crow, and R. Dorsey

New directions in research on the Bouse Formation and the origins of   the lower Colorado River

 
10:20

BREAK



 
10:40

L. C. Crossey, K. E. Karlstrom, R. S. Crow, P. K. House, and P. Pearthree

Travertines of the Bouse Formation

 
11:00

Keith A. Howard, D. V. Malmon. J. W. Hillhouse, R. J. Dorsey, R. S.   Crow, and P. K. House

Magnetostratigraphic constraints on the Bouse Formation in the Blythe   Basin— existing evidence

 
11:20

Kristin McDougall and Adriana Yanet Miranda-Martínez

Bouse Formation along the lower Colorado River corridor: tracking the   transition from marine estuary to saline lake

 
11:40

Rebecca J. Dorsey, B. O’Connell, M. Homan, and K. Howard

Upper limestone of the southern Bouse Formation: evidence for unsteady   origins of the Colorado River

 
12:00

LUNCH



 
1:20

Walter Feller

Life in the Mojave: Wyatt Berry Stapp Earp

 
1:40

Jordon Bright, Andrew S. Cohen, and Philip A. Pearthree

Stable oxygen (δ18O) isotope data from paired inorganic calcite and   ostracode valve analyses suggest a lacustrine origin for the southern Bouse   formation, southwestern AZ and southeastern CA

 
2:00

Brennan O’Connell** and Rebecca J. Dorsey

Depositional paleoenvironments of the basal carbonate member of the   southern Bouse Formation, Cibola, Arizona

 
2:20

BREAK

 
2:40

Brian F. Gootee, P. A. Pearthree, P. K. House, Ann Youberg, B.   O’Connell, and Jordon Bright

A sequence-stratigraphic interpretation of the upper bioclastic unit   capping the Bouse Formationin the Cibola Area, Arizona and California

 
3:00

Brennan O’Connell**, R. J. Dorsey, M. Homan, B. F. Gootee, and K.   House

Structural controls on stratigraphic architecture of the southern   Bouse Formation near Cibola, Arizona

 
3:20

Break

 
3:40

Tom Spinks

Pliocene fossil woods from the Colorado River delta: what do we know?

 
4:00

P. Kyle House and Philip A. Pearthree

From the sublime to the ridiculous: spectacular, weird, and surprising   sedimentary structures in the Bouse Formation

 
4:30

Jim Bishop



Mountain/desertthunderstorms: their formationand field-forecasting   guidelines.

 
5:40

DINNER

Arrange carpools

 
7:00

Saturday evening: Fill gas tanks for Sunday’s 250 mile field trip.

 
Sunday,   April 17

 
7:00 – 8:15

Breakfast – packed lunch provided. Catered dinner east of Parker.

 
Monday,   April 18 - Pot Luck! Bring personal meals

 
           

Additional
information to follow.

Please forward this information to other interested individuals and invite them
to send their email addresses to Bill Presch, California State University,
Fullerton:
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
http://nsm.fullerton.edu/dsc
  

Click here to download Desert Symposium Instruction for Authors
Click here for Release Form

2016 volume of the proceedings for the Desert Symposium:

Going LOCO Cover Page 1Going LOCO Cover Page 2
2016 Going LOCO

A volume with symposium abstracts and a field trip guide is produced each year, and available at the symposium. Past symposium volumes are available as PDF downloads. Click on any volume(s) of interest below.

2001 Changing Face
2002 Between the Basins
2003 Lost Lakes
2004 Breaking Up
2005 Old Ores
2006 Making Tracks
2007 Wild, Scenic and Rapid
2008 Trough to Trough
2009 Landscape Evolution At An Active Plate Margin
2010 Overboard in the Mojave: 20 Million Years of Lakes and Wetlands
2011 The Incredible Shrinking Pliocene
2012 Search for the Pliocene: the southern exposures
2013 Raising Questions in the central Mojave Desert
2014 Not a drop left to drink
2015 Mojave Miocene

Judith Presch Scholarship

The scholarship is open to undergraduate and graduate students pursuing research in the Mojave Desert. The scholarship is named in memory of Judith A. Presch, Human Resource Specialist, California State University, Fullerton and Desert Studies Center Supporter. Awarded annually to one undergraduate and one graduate student working through the Desert Studies Center, the successful applicants may also have all fees waived for use of the Desert Studies Center facilities for one year. Applications will be reviewed and evaluated by the Research Award Committee of the California Desert Studies Consortium. Awards will be announced in November. For additional information and application contact the Desert Studies Office at Department of Biological Science, California State University, Fullerton.

Volunteering

The California Desert Studies Consortium welcomes your interest in the volunteer program at the Desert Studies Center. Volunteers are an important part of the activities and programs at the Center. Sharing time, abilities, knowledge, and enthusiasm by working with the staff of the Center ensures a continuing high quality experience for you and our users. Serving as a volunteer is your way of saying thanks and involving your time in an institution whose goals you support.

The work is greatly appreciated by the Center and is both rewarding and fulfilling to the volunteer. Some of the tasks performed by volunteers include long-term data collection on bird species found on the Center’s grounds, working with computer/library cataloging, assisting with maintenance of the facilities’ infrastructure and utilizing personal skills and experience to enhance the user’s experience. Our volunteers form a diverse group of individuals with varying backgrounds. The minimum age is 21; there is no upper limit.

As a Center volunteer, you will be subject to California State University regulations. A volunteer is a person who contributes services for which there is no financial compensation. The services are given on a scheduled basis for assigned projects under the supervision of the Center’s Manager. No evaluation or recommendation, verbal or written, will be provided by the Center.

After completing an application form, a volunteer candidate may be asked to come to the Center for a preliminary interview. Volunteers will furnish references upon request. Volunteers are assigned tasks according to their skills and interests. All tasks are at the direction of the Manager.

All volunteers must submit an application form and sign a CSU Volunteer Identification Form. If you have a résumé available, please attach it to the email that will appear after you click "submit."

Volunteer

Volunteering at the Desert Studies Center The California Desert Studies Consortium welcomes your interest in the volunteer program at the Desert Studies Center. Volunteers are an important part of the activities and programs at the Center. Sharing time, abilities, knowledge, and enthusiasm by working with the staff of the Center ensures a continuing high quality experience for you and our users. Serving as a volunteer is your way of saying thanks and involving your time in an institution whose goals you support.

The work is greatly appreciated by the Center and is both rewarding and fulfilling to the volunteer. Some of the tasks performed by volunteers include long-term data collection on bird species found on the Center’s grounds, working with computer/library cataloging, assisting with maintenance of the facilities’ infrastructure and utilizing personal skills and experience to enhance the user’s experience. Our volunteers form a diverse group of individuals with varying backgrounds. The minimum age is 21; there is no upper limit.

As a Center volunteer, you will be subject to California State University regulations. A volunteer is a person who contributes services for which there is no financial compensation. The services are given on a scheduled basis for assigned projects under the supervision of the Center’s Site Manager. No evaluation or recommendation, verbal or written, will be provided by the Center.

Interviews

After completing an application form, a volunteer candidate may be asked to come to the Center for a preliminary interview. Volunteers will furnish references upon request. Volunteers are assigned tasks according to their skills and interests. All tasks are at the direction of the Site Manager.

Volunteers may be terminated if it is found that there is no longer a need for their services, or if their performance does not meet the requirements of the Site Manager.

Responsibilities

Volunteers are expected to arrive at the agreed upon time. Incoming and outgoing personal telephone calls on the Center’s line must be restricted to emergencies. No property from the Center, including books, shall be removed from the Center.

All volunteers must submit an application form and sign a CSU Volunteer Identification Form. Please click here to fill out an application form.